COOPERATIVE LINUX Full Seminar Report
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 1 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Computer Science Clay
Active In SP
**

Posts: 712
Joined: Jan 2009
#1
01-03-2009, 02:09 PM


COOPERATIVE LINUX

.pdf   Cooperative Linux.pdf (Size: 515.77 KB / Downloads: 654)
Abstract
Software development for an embedded Linux system in most cases requires a free license of GCC (GNU C/C++ compiler) and accessories. Many developers find it disconcerting that the GNU tools are primarily available for Linux-based PCs. Any attempt to make GCC run under Windows in order to program an embedded Linux system has been fraught with problems until now. The popular Cygwin “ as a Unix/Linux emulation environment under Windows “ is much too slow and in most cases causes significant library and version conflicts. Despite the high costs, commercial attempts by some companies to provide GCC as a Windows application have not lead to any practical solutions. Even here, there are typically significant library problems. As a result, many users have no other alternative than to use a Linux distribution as a second operating system on the Windows PC to be able to use GCC tools. Without some effort, this technically straightforward solution is not feasible for large companies in particular, because an IT department is responsible for the PCs. Users are not able to just install a new operating system to boot instead of Windows. Another obstacle is often times getting familiar with a new PC operating system.Many questions can arise, such as: How can I change the network settings (e.g. IP address, etc.)? Where can I find a Telnet client? Which editor should I use? How can I later install other software components? The list could go on ad nauseam. The bottom line is that significant orientation time is required for a knowledgeable Windows user to get familiar with the new environment. In this report we™ll describe Cooperative Linux, a port of the Linux kernel that allows it to run as an unprivileged lightweight virtual machine in kernel mode, on top of another OS kernel. It allows Linux to run under any operating system that supports loading drivers, such as Windows or Linux, after minimal porting efforts. The report includes the present and future implementation details, its applications, and its comparison with other Linux virtualization methods. Among the technical details I™ll present the CPU-complete context switch code, hardware Cooperative Linux 6 interrupt forwarding, the interface between the host OS and Linux, and the management of the VM™s pseudo physical RAM. An alternative to using a Linux PC is a free license of Cooperative Linux (coLinux).This Linux project and implimentation is a new approach to getting the Linux kernel to run under Windows XP. CoLinux contains special Windows drivers, which allow it to run under Windows XP as a guest operating system with all privileges.
Introduction
Cooperative Linux utilizes the rather underused concept of a Cooperative Virtual Machine (CVM), in contrast to traditional VM™s that are unprivileged and being under the complete control of the host machine. The term Cooperative is used to describe two entities working in parallel, e.g. coroutines. In that sense the most plain description of Cooperative Linux is turning two operating system kernels into two big coroutines. In that Mode, each kernel has its own complete CPU context and address space, and each kernel decides when to give control back to its partner. However, only one of the two kernels has control on the physical hardware, where the other is provided only with virtual hardware abstraction. From this point on in the report I™ll refer to these two kernels as the host operating system, and the guest Linux VM respectively. The host can be every OS kernel that exports basic primitives that provide the Cooperative Linux portable driver to run in CPL0 mode (ring 0) and allocate memory. The special CPL0 approach in Cooperative Linux makes it significantly different than traditional virtualization solutions such as VMware, plex86, Virtual PC, and other methods such as Xen. All of these approaches work by running the guest OS in a less privileged mode than of the host kernel. This approach allowed for the extensive simplification of Cooperative Linux™s design and its short early beta development cycle which lasted only one month, starting from scratch by modifying the vanilla Linux 2.4.23-pre9 release until reaching to the point where KDE could run. The only downside to the CPL0 approach is stability Cooperative Linux 7 and security. If it™s unstable, it has the potential to crash the system. However, measures can be taken, such as cleanly shutting it down on the first internal Oops or panic. Another disadvantage is security. Acquiring root user access on a Cooperative Linux machine can potentially lead to root on the host machine if the attacker loads specially crafted kernel module or uses some very elaborated exploit in case which the Cooperative Linux kernel was compiled without module support. Most of the changes in the Cooperative Linux patch are on the i386 tree”the only supported architecture for Cooperative at the time of this writing. The other changes are mostly additions of virtual drivers: cobd (block device), conet (network), and cocon (console). Most of the changes in the i386 tree involve the initialization and setup code. It is a goal of the Cooperative Linux kernel design to remain as close as possible to the standalone i386 kernel, so all changes are localized and minimized as much as possible.
Use Search at http://topicideas.net/search.php wisely To Get Information About Project Topic and Seminar ideas with report/source code along pdf and ppt presenaion
Reply
project topics
Active In SP
**

Posts: 2,492
Joined: Mar 2010
#2
03-04-2010, 09:32 PM

Introduction
Cooperative Linux utilizes the rather underused concept of a Cooperative Virtual Machine (CVM), in contrast to traditional VMs that are unprivileged and being under the complete control of the host machine. The term Cooperative is used to describe two entities working in parallel, e.g. coroutines [2]. In that sense the most plain description of Cooperative Linux is turning two operating system kernels into two big coroutines. In that mode, each kernel has its own complete CPU context and address space, and each kernel decides when to give control back to its partner. However, only one of the two kernels has control on the physical hardware, where the other is provided only with virtual hardware abstraction. From this point on in the paper I™ll refer to these two kernels as the host operating system, and the guest Linux VM respectively. The host can be every OS kernel that exports basic primitives that provide the Cooperative Linux portable driver to run in CPL0 mode (ring 0) and allocate memory. The special CPL0 approach in Cooperative Linux makes it significantly different than traditional virtualization solutions such as VMware, plex86, Virtual PC, and other methods such as Xen. All of these approaches work by running the guest OS in a less privileged mode than of the host kernel. This approach allowed for the extensive simplification of Cooperative Linux™s design and its short earlybeta development cycle which lasted only one month, starting from scratch by modifying the vanilla Linux 2.4.23-pre9 release until reaching to the point where KDE could run. The only downsides to the CPL0 approach is stability and security. If it™s unstable, it has the potential to crash the system. However, measures can be taken, such as cleanly shutting it down on the first internal Oops or panic. Another disadvantage is security. Acquiring root user access on a Cooperative Linux machine can potentially lead to root on the host machine if the attacker loads specially crafted kernel module or uses some very elaborated exploit in case which the Cooperative Linux kernel was compiled without module support. Most of the changes in the Cooperative Linux patch are on the i386 tree”the only supported architecture for Cooperative at the time of this writing. The other changes are mostly additions of virtual drivers: cobd (block device), conet (network), and cocon (console). Most of the changes in the i386 tree involve the initialization and setup code. It is a goal of the Cooperative Linux kernel design to remain as close as possible to the standalone i386 kernel, so all changes are localized and

read more
colinuxpublications/Reprint-Aloni-OLS2004.pdf
Use Search at http://topicideas.net/search.php wisely To Get Information About Project Topic and Seminar ideas with report/source code along pdf and ppt presenaion
Reply
computer science topics
Active In SP
**

Posts: 610
Joined: Jun 2010
#3
29-06-2010, 12:58 AM

ABSTRACT
Cooperative Linux, abbrieviated as coLinux, is software that lets Microsoft Windows cooperate with the Linux kernel to run both in parallel on the same machine. Cooperative Linux utilizes the concept of a Cooperative Virtual Machine (CVM). In contrast to traditional VMs, the CVM shares resources that already exist in the host OS. In traditional (host) VMs, resources are virtualized for every (guest) OS. The CVM gives both OSs complete control of the host machine while the traditional VM sets every guest OS in an unprivileged state to access the real machine. The term \"cooperative\" is used to describe two entities working in parallel. In effect Cooperative Linux turns the two different operating system kernels into two big coroutines. Each kernel has its own complete CPU context and address space, and each kernel decides when to give control back to its partner. However, while both kernels theoretically have full access to the real hardware, modern PC hardware is not designed to be controlled by two different operating systems at the same time. Therefore the host kernel is left in control of the real hardware and the guest kernel contains special drivers that communicate with the host and provide various important devices to the guest OS
Use Search at http://topicideas.net/search.php wisely To Get Information About Project Topic and Seminar ideas with report/source code along pdf and ppt presenaion
Reply
seminar surveyer
Active In SP
**

Posts: 3,541
Joined: Sep 2010
#4
08-10-2010, 10:20 AM

INTRODUCTION
Cooperative Linux utilizes the rather underused concept of a Cooperative Virtual Machine (CVM), in contrast to traditional VMs that are unprivileged and being under the complete control of the host machine. The term Cooperative is used to describe two entities working in parallel, e.g. coroutines [2]. In that sense the most plain description of Cooperative Linux is turning two operating system kernels into two big coroutines. In that mode, each kernel has its own complete CPU context and address space, and each kernel decides when to give control back to its partner.
However, only one of the two kernels has control on the physical hardware, where the other is provided only with virtual hardware abstraction. From this point on in the paper I'll refer to these two kernels as the host operating system, and the guest Linux VM respectively. The host can be every OS kernel that exports basic primitives that provide the Cooperative Linux portable driver to run in CPL0 mode (ring 0) and allocate memory. The special CPL0 approach in Cooperative Linux makes it significantly different than traditional virtualization solutions such as VMware, plex86, Virtual PC, and other methods such as Xen. All of these approaches work by running the guest OS in a less privileged mode than of the host kernel. This approach allowed for the extensive simplification of Cooperative Linux's design and its short earlybeta development cycle which lasted only one month, starting from scratch by modifying the vanilla Linux 2.4.23-pre9 release until reaching to the point where KDE could run.
The only downsides to the CPL0 approach is stability and security. If it's unstable, it has the potential to crash the system. However, measures can be taken, such as cleanly shutting it down on the first internal Oops or panic. Another disadvantage is security. Acquiring root user access on a Cooperative Linux machine can potentially lead to root on the host machine if the attacker loads specially crafted kernel module or uses some very elaborated exploit in case which the Cooperative Linux kernel was compiled without module support.
One Most of the changes in the Cooperative Linux patch are on the i386 tree-the only supported architecture for Cooperative at the time of this writing. The other changes are mostly additions of virtual drivers: cobd (block device), conet (network), and cocon (console). Most of the changes in the i386 tree involve the initialization and setup code. It is a goal of the Cooperative Linux kernel design to remain as close as possible to the standalone i386 kernel, so all changes are localized and minimized as much as possible.
2. USES
Cooperative Linux in its current early state can already provide some of the uses that User Mode Linux[1] provides, such as virtual hosting, kernel development environment, research, and testing of new distributions or buggy software. It also enabled new uses:
Relatively effortless migration path from Windows.
In the process of switching to another OS, there is the choice between installing another computer, dualbooting, or using a virtualization software. The first option costs money, the second is tiresome in terms of operation, but the third can be the most quick and easy method-especially if it's free. This is where Cooperative Linux comes in. It is already used in workplaces to convert Windows users to Linux.
Adding Windows machines to Linux clusters.
The Cooperative Linux patch is minimal and can be easily combined with others such as the MOSIX or Open-MOSIX patches that add clustering capabilities to the kernel. This work in progress allows to addWindows machines to super-computer clusters, where one illustration could tell about a secretary workstation computer that runs Cooperative Linux as a screen saver-when the secretary goes home at the end of the day and leaves the computer unattended, the office's cluster gets more CPU cycles for free.
Running an otherwise-dual-booted Linux system from the other OS.
The Windows port of Cooperative Linux allows it to mount real disk partitions as block devices. Numerous people are using this in order to access, rescue, or just run their Linux system from their ext3 or reiserfs file systems.
Using Linux as a Windows firewall on the same machine.
As a likely competitor to other out-of-the-box Windows firewalls, iptables along with a stripped-down Cooperative Linux system can potentially serve as a network firewall.
Reply
odogu
Active In SP
**

Posts: 8
Joined: Dec 2011
#5
19-01-2012, 06:43 AM

please i would like to apply for the above seminar and presentation topic and will be happy if my request is granted. tanks chuks.
Reply
seminar addict
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 6,592
Joined: Jul 2011
#6
19-01-2012, 10:20 AM

to get information about the topic COOPERATIVE LINUX Full Seminar Report ,ppt and related topics refer the link bellow
topicideashow-to-cooperative-linux-full-seminar and presentation-report

topicideashow-to-cooperative-linux

topicideashow-to-cooperative-linux--2627

topicideashow-to-cooperative-linux-full-seminar and presentation-report?pid=62283#pid62283

Reply

Important Note..!

If you are not satisfied with above reply ,..Please

ASK HERE

So that we will collect data for you and will made reply to the request....OR try below "QUICK REPLY" box to add a reply to this page

Quick Reply
Message
Type your reply to this message here.


Image Verification
Please enter the text contained within the image into the text box below it. This process is used to prevent automated spam bots.
Image Verification
(case insensitive)

Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  web spoofing full report computer science technology 13 8,921 20-05-2016, 11:59 AM
Last Post: Dhanabhagya
  REDTACTON A SEMINAR REPORT project girl 2 535 25-04-2016, 03:58 PM
Last Post: mkaasees
  seminar report on cyber terrorism pdf jaseelati 0 308 23-02-2015, 01:49 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  seminar report on internet of things jaseelati 0 361 29-01-2015, 04:51 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  nano ic engine seminar report jaseelati 0 299 21-01-2015, 01:43 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  google glass seminar report pdf jaseelati 0 326 21-01-2015, 01:41 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  rolltop laptop seminar report jaseelati 0 273 17-01-2015, 03:15 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  bicmos technology seminar report jaseelati 0 321 09-01-2015, 02:58 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  3d optical data storage technology seminar report jaseelati 0 403 06-01-2015, 04:47 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  icloud seminar report jaseelati 0 242 05-01-2015, 03:28 PM
Last Post: jaseelati