Civil Engineering Seminar Report And Abstract8
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15-02-2009, 01:41 PM


Breakage (Soil) Mechanics

Introduction
Critical state soil mechanics (CSSM) was originally developed for clays. For this application CSSM continues to provide the most elegant mathematical theory for capturing the physics of the material. In its simplicity, only five parameters are needed to describe a broad range of critical effects. However, when CSSM is adapted to model sand-agglomerates, models can no longer be accurately defined using five parameters. The CSSM theory requires fitting the slope of the "isotropic-hardening" compression line in the void-ratio/logarithm-of-pressure space. The problem is that in sands the slope is no longer unique and the fitting exercise is doomed to fail. Another constant, the "specific volume parameter" N, ceases to be a constant in sand and becomes heavily dependent on the grain size distribution and initial void ratio. These inconsistencies are widely accepted but have not yet been overcome, at least not without adding parameters.

In my talk I will present a new theory called "breakage mechanics", when generally applied to brittle granular materials, or "breakage soil mechanics" when specifically applied to sands, which resolves the aforementioned problems.
Numerical analysis of evolving gradings in crushable granular materials
Numerical analysis of evolving gradings in crushable granular materials

Introduction
The purpose of most geotechnical foundations is to deliver the dynamic and static loads from the overlaying engineering structures to the soil, often being brittle sand. Grain crushing “ a phenomenon that accompanies brittle sand “ is often a consequence of these loads. The constitutive behavior of granular material is strongly influenced by the topological changes that arise from grain crushing. As an example, crushing may lead to significant reduction in the volume of voids, the hydraulic conductivity and the angle of shearing resistance. Therefore, sand crushing has to be thoroughly studied to gain profound understanding on the physical reasons behind this challenging problem, but also for being able to predict consequences, in the form of catastrophic collapse problems of civil engineering structures.

In this seminar and presentation I will present the development of a new algorithm that is aimed to allow discrete element simulations to accommodate grain crushing. The main advantage of this new capability is in enabling to visualise and analyse the evolution of sand crushing.
Numerical modelling of Earthquake and wave induced liquefaction
Numerical modelling of Earthquake and wave induced liquefaction

Introduction
Liquefaction caused extensive damage and loss of human lives in many earthquakes. Examples can be found in Alaska (1964), Niigata (1964), Loma Prieta near San Francisco (1989), Hyogoken-Nambu near Kobe (1995). The numerical modelling of liquefaction requires

* A mathematical approximation for the mechanical Behaviour for which Biot (1956) is used
* A discretising procedure for the numerical Solution - Finite Element Method in space and Generalised Newmark (Finite Difference) in time is employed
* A constitutive model for the material behaviour - Pastor Zienkiewicz mark III (1986) model is used

The lecture will include
* Examples of historical liquefaction damage to building and infrastructure
* The formulation of the numerical procedure and treatment of far-field boundary condition using Boundary Element Method
* Verification using exact solutions
* Validation by comparing with centrifuge test with dynamic earthquake-like excitation
* Validation by comparing with wave flume experiments for wave induced liquefaction

About the presenter

Professor Andrew Chan completed his MPhil from University of Hong Kong under the supervision of Professor YK Cheung in 1985, and a PhD from University College of Swansea under the supervisor of Professor OC Zienkiewicz in 1989. From his supervisors, one can easily see that Andrew is a "Finite Element method" researcher. Andrew has been The University of Birmingham since 1995, from a reader in 1995 to a Professor of computational Engineering in 2005. Andrew has been working on structural engineering and geotechnical engineering. He is one of key researchers for EU program-Liquefaction around marine structures (LIAMS) during 2001-2004. he is the developer of FEM program-SWANDYNE II, and co-author of the book "Computational Geomechanics" (iem.bham.ac.uk/swandyne/ ).
Pressure measurements in full-scale steel silos
Pressure measurements in full-scale steel silos

Introduction
Many problems have arisen due to failures of silo structures. For more than a hundred years researchers have studied these problems by means of theoretical, numerical and experimental studies. The theoretical and numerical studies need to be calibrated and validated using information obtained from experimental studies. However, the complexity and the costs of the experimental installations have limited their number. Therefore, there is still a lack of data for developing necessary understanding of phenomena that occur inside the silos (Brown and Nielsen, 1995). Many different types of experimental silos have been studied throughout the world since the first tests carried out in model silos made of wood (Janssen, 1895).

The present study shows the initial results from pressure measurements in an installation of three metallic full-scale silos. These silos are made of a conical roof, a cylindrical part and a conical hopper with different eccentricity (0%, 50%,100%) for each one. The cylindrical part has an aspect ratio of 2.5 (height 5.0 m, diameter 2.0 m) and the height of the hoppers are 1.6 m and have a circular outlet with a diameter of 0.32 m.

Pressure cells have been mounted at three levels in each silo to obtain the pattern of normal pressures around the wall. The first and the second level are close to the bin-hopper junction. At each level four positions spaced 90? apart are available for mounting the cells at. The third level is placed 1.8 m above the junction. Furthermore, a vertical distribution of cells along the silo wall has been set in the silo with concentric hopper.

In this study, the silo with concentric hopper has been instrumented with a total of 12 cells for measuring normal pressures along a vertical line of the silo wall. These cells consist of a system of strain gauges (Pople, 1979) mounted on a stainless steel clamped diaphragm. The interpretation of the initial results has covered several phenomena that frequently occur in this type of structures. They are: oscillations of the load from the stored material against the silo wall, unsymmetrical distribution of pressures around the silo wall, and patch-loads which are detected at different levels of the silo during the discharge process. A comparison has been carried out between the experimental results and the load model prescribed in a silo code (ENV 1991-4, 1995). The study of the observed phenomena will be further developed when results obtained from normal pressure cells mounted around the silo wall are available.

The obtained results contribute to the understanding of those phenomena that occur inside silos which is of importance for a more economic and safe design of silo structures.
Application of two layered wave system on analysis of progressive liquefaction
Application of two layered wave system on analysis of progressive liquefaction

Introduction
The evaluation for wave-induced liquefaction behavior of seabed is of practical significance in the design and construction of marine structures and offshore installations. There are two different mechanisms of wave-induced liquefaction. One is caused by the oscillating excess pore pressure, named oscillating liquefaction or transient liquefaction. The other is caused by the residual pore pressure due to the plastic characteristic of seabed, which is called progressive liquefaction or residual liquefaction. In this seminor, I will give a presentation on the latter mechanism. As a widely used method, the pore water pressure build-up pattern of soil under undrained shearing is incorporated with consolidation equation to establish dynamic consolidation equation and then analytical or numerical method is applied to solve the equation. The critical limitation for such method is only the occurrence of liquefaction can be determined and the equations will be invalid after the occurrence of liquefaction.

In recent years, a series of centrifuge tests were conducted by Sassa and Skeguchi. Based on those tests, the importance of the cyclic plasticity of soil was emphasized and a new analysis method was proposed for progressive liquefaction. In their method, the liquefied soil is treated as a special inviscid fluid and Lambâ„¢s theory of two-layered wave system is used to describe the problem after the occurrence of liquefaction. However, the viscosity of the fluid used to describe the liquefied soil is not considered in their research. It was proved that viscosity did exist for liquefied sand by experiments. Thus, the consideration of viscosity is necessary in the analysis. To take the viscosity effect into analysis, a two layered wave model based on Navier-Stokes equations is developed to describe the progressive nature of wave-induced liquefaction. In the proposed model, both water and liquefied soil are treated as viscous fluids, and finite difference method is employed to solve the problem. It is found that Sassaâ„¢s procedure will overestimate the liquefaction depth and the influence of viscous effects is significant.
Shear Lag Failure Mode of Hollow Flange Channel Sections with Web Side Plate Connections
Shear Lag Failure Mode of Hollow Flange Channel Sections with Web Side Plate Connections

Introduction
The LiteSteel Beam (LSB), previously called hollow flange channel, is an innovative structural section developed by Smorgon Steel Tube Mills. The section is primarily intended for use in the light industrial, commercial and domestic flooring and roofing. This presentation will describe the shear lag failure mode observed in an experimental study commenced in The University of Sydney on the behaviour of LSB sections with web side plate (WSP) connections.

Shear lag failure mode is one of the three failure modes observed in the tests. It meanly involves the lateral displacement of the top and bottom hollow flanges of the LSB section and the distortion of the web. It is so termed because it is though that the primary cause of such failure mode is the horizontal shear stresses in the hollow flanges. This presentation will discuss the formation of the failure mode. A quantative determination of the failing load will then be described and a final recommendation of its design will be given after a reliability analysis.
Water wave predictions with roots in the Lattice Boltzmann Eqn.
Water wave predictions with roots in the Lattice Boltzmann Eqn.

Introduction
The common theme of this research is to address the principle challenge and scientific issue in simulation of moving interfaces, especially free surface water waves, high Reynolds number flows and the fluid interaction with fixed and moving objects. Many large flexible structures exhibit unacceptable movement in water waves and wind fields. The fluid processes and the interaction between structure and fluid are typically nonlinear. The research theme is also a natural candidate for general control of vibration issues including damping device development. The present and former studies have also benefited educational and research efforts in the ocean and wind renewable energy sector as well as other topics of concern to the ocean and wind engineering community.

Development of numerical models to accurately capture nonlinearities at the free surface and bluff-body flows is important in advancing research in ocean engineering, aerodynamics and related sciences. This talk introduces and focuses on an alternative method to traditional numerical models, rooted in the Lattice Boltzmann equations, to examine the underlying physics of breaking waves, and bluff-body boundary layers. Highlight of achievements and work in progress will be demonstrated through a variety of test cases including the treatment of shocks (bores) and long wave run-up. Other research work and directions shall also be mentioned and discussed with the audience.

Biography

Jannette Frandsen received the B.Sc. from the Technical University of Denmark (1991) and the M.Sc. from Imperial College London (1996). She earned the doctorate at Cambridge University Engineering Department (2000). Hereafter she served as an assistant professor at Oxford and concurrently held a Junior Research Fellowship at Oriel College (1999-2002). Then she moved to USA and joined Louisiana State University as Assistant Professor of Civil Engrg. (2002-2005). Currently, she is an Associate Professor at the University of Hawaii, Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering. Underpinning her academic experience, she also worked in industry (1988-1995) as a structural/ocean engineer where she got involved with analysis of fixed offshore platforms and semi-submersibles. Her research interests are in the areas of fluid dynamics, nonlinear free-surface water waves, aerodynamics, fluid-structure interactions and control.
Direct Strength Design of Cold-Formed Purlins
Direct Strength Design of Cold-Formed Purlins

Introduction
The Limit States Australian/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4600:2005 and the North American Specification for the Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structural Members 2001 (2004 Supplement) include the newly developed Direct Strength Method of Design (DSM). In both Standards, the method presented (Chapter 7 of AS/NZS 4600:2005, Appendix 1 of NAS) is limited to pure compression and pure bending. The situation of combined bending and shear as occurs in a continuous purlin system is not considered.

In order to extend the DSM to purlin systems, it is necessary to prescribe and calibrate a method for combined bending and shear. Eight different test series on purlin sheeting systems with single, double and triple spans and both uplift and downwards load cases as well as screw and concealed sheeting have been performed at the University of Sydney over a 10 year period. As many of these tests consisted of continuous lapped purlins where combined bending and shear occurred at the purlin section just outside the end of the lap, it is possible to use this test data to propose an extension to the DSM. Furthermore, calibration of the proposals using the limit states design methodology is included in the report
State-of-the-art Development of the Reflector Structure of FAST
State-of-the-art Development of the Reflector Structure of FAST

Introduction
FAST, Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, is proposed for construct the Large Telescope (LT) by Chinese astronomers and engineering experts in 1993 and FAST will be the largest radio telescope in the world. FAST is a novel telescope with an overall aperture 500m, a radius of curvature 300m and a usable aperture 300m. As one important sub-system of FAST, the main active reflector brings great challenge to engineers. Based on an amount of theoretical and experimental research on the active reflector of FAST by authors in these past years, the feasibility of this innovative cable-net structure has been verified. The presentation is briefly introduced the structural concept of the active main reflector, theoretical and experiment study on the cable-net structure and back structure of the reflector sequentially. Finally, the analysis, design, construction and test of the 30m demonstrator of FAST in Miyun Astronomic Observation Station are introduced.

In 1993, 10 countries including USA, Australia, Canada, Netherlands and China have offered a proposal for construct the Large Telescope (LT), which nowadays is referred to as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). Now, astronomers in many countries are engaged in research on SKA plan actively. Chinese astronomers and engineering experts proposed to use an active main spherical reflector and take advantage of Karst terrain of Guizhou Province in China for construct a giant radio telescope -FAST (Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope), and FAST will be the largest radio telescope in the world.

The innovative engineering concept and design pave a new road to realizing a huge single dish in the most effective way. Three outstanding features of the telescope are the unique Karst depressions as the sites, the reflector which corrects spherical aberration on the ground to achieve full polarization and a wide band without involving a complex feed system, and the light focus cabin driven by cables and servomechanism plus a parallel robot as secondary adjustable system to precisely position the feeds. FAST is a novel telescope with an overall aperture 500m, a radius of curvature 300m and a usable aperture 300m. As one important sub-system of FAST, the main active reflector brings great challenge to engineers. Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 show the 3-D image and basic conceptual sketch of FAST.
Stability Analysis of a Beam Structure and its Control with Piezoelectric Layers
Stability Analysis of a Beam Structure and its Control with Piezoelectric Layers

Introduction
This seminar and presentation presents the flutter and buckling analysis of a general beam structure and its flutter and buckling capacity enhancement with a pair of piezoelectric layers.

The co-existence of flutter and buckling in a general beam structure due to the presence of a follower force is an interesting and important phenomenon. The analysis of this phenomenon is significant in the design of beam structures. First, the critical transition-curved surface for differentiating the two distinct unstable forms of the beam, i.e. flutter and buckling, is defined. The capacity of the follower force is also derived for flutter and buckling of the beam. Second, the great potential of smart materials such as piezoelectric layers and shape memory alloys in enhancing flutter and buckling capacity of structures is explored. Location and size effects of piezoelectric layers in enhancing structural stability capacity are revealed in the research.

The research may be used as a benchmark for flutter and buckling analysis of beams. Moreover, this research provides an accurate model in enhancing the flutter and buckling capacities of engineering structures.

In addition to this specific research, Dr. Wang will also introduce some of his recent research findings in other areas, such as the structural health monitoring with smart materials and nano-mechanics.

Biography

Dr. Wang received his Ph.D. in 1994 from Peking University. He has conducted research in Hong Kong University, Nanyang Tech. University, University of South Carolina, Purdue University, National University of Singapore, and the University of Central Florida. He is currently a Canada Research Chair and an associate professor in the University of Manitoba. His research topics include: health monitoring of structures with wavelet technique and smart materials, wave excitation and propagation in piezoelectric coupled structures, vibration and control of structures by piezoelectric materials, stability analysis and control of structures by use of piezoelectric materials and shape memory alloy (SMA), repair of cracked and delaminated structures with piezoelectric materials, and nano-mechanics. His research papers have been published in leading refereed international journals, such as Applied Physics Letters, Physical Review B, International Journal of Solids and Structures, ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics, ASCE Journal of Engineering Mechanics, Smart Materials and Structures, Physics Letters A and etc. His research findings has received more than 330 SCI citations. Dr. Wang is the recipient of many rewards such as Intellectual Property Award and Technology Transfer Award sponsored by University of South Carolina. He is an editorial board member of 3 international journals.
Instant Structural Analysis: A Tool for Structural Engineering Students and Engineers
Instant Structural Analysis: A Tool for Structural Engineering Students and Engineers

Introduction
This seminar and presentation will discuss the need to educate structural engineering students and engineers with the proper understanding of the global structural behaviour. Following the catastrophic collapse of the WTC in the 9/11 it became more apparent that understanding progressive failure or collapse in structures is of paramount important. To prevent total structural collapse when part or parts of the structure are damaged or destroyed, the structure must be capable of re-distributing internal forces to provide alternative load-paths to prevent catastrophic collapse. For this to occur the structure must have adequate degree of redundancy and engineers will need to understand how the structure may progressively respond under different possible load conditions including in the extreme case of a terrorist attack.

A new approach for teaching structural analysis and design is through the use of instant structural analysis software that are capable of stimulating rapid experimental learning as well as being used as a creative design tool. We need to re-think and if necessary, revise our curriculum to phase out or reduce the use of old-fashion manual calculation techniques, and instead to emphasize the understanding of the physical/holistic structural behaviour. Manual techniques such as column analogy, conjugate beam theory, moment distribution for frames with side sway, etc are no longer needed.

An easy-to-use instant structural analysis software with full graphic interface has been developed for 2D structures. This software provides a handy tool for teachers and engineers alike, and learn about structural behaviour and design. It gives instant graphical results that accurately simulate structural response thus promoting self-learning and creativity.

Biography

Professor S. Kitipornchai is a Chair Professor and Head of the Department of Building and Construction at the City University of Hong Kong. Prior to joining City University of Hong Kong he had been working at the University of Queensland since 1976 and was conferred the title Emeritus Professor in 2004.
He is the Regional Editor (Asia-Pacific) of the Engineering Structures journal since 1993. He is also member of a number of Editorial Boards of other journals and serves as the member of a number of international working committees. His research is well known in the areas of structural stability, thin-walled structures, transmission towers, cold-formed structures and non-linear analysis of structures. Many of his work have been adopted by the industry through code rules, design handbooks, software and numerous consultancies.

Professor Kitipornchai is an author of 7 books, 7 book chapters, over 300 refereed international journal and conference papers. In 1992, he was awarded prestigious Munro Prize Award for the Best Paper in Engineering Structures journal for his pioneering work on the nonlinear modelling of transmission towers.
Impacts of Global Climate Change and Sea-level Rise in the Coastal Regions of Bangladesh
Impacts of Global Climate Change and Sea-level Rise in the Coastal Regions of Bangladesh

Introduction
This presentation will start with a brief summary of global climate change and sea-level rise and then it will present some observed data along the Bay of Bengal where rate of sea-level rise is larger than global average rate. It will then outline the possible impacts in the coastal regions of Bangladesh with especial attention to coastal flooding, erosion and salinity intrusion.

Some useful numerical tools to investigate cyclone-induced storm surge and associated coastal flooding will also be described. It will then present simulated results of coastal flooding for different climate scenarios.

At the final part, it will show on-going as well as recommended adaptation measures along the coastal belt. Finally, the presentation will come to an end with a set of recommendations that might be useful for any low-lying deltaic countries or island countries to cope with future adverse climate.
Application of BEM to Wave Interaction with Multi-Bodies & A brief of coastal facilities at DUT
Application of BEM to Wave Interaction with Multi-Bodies & A brief of coastal facilities at DUT

Introduction
This seminar and presentation will firstly describe the facilities for Coastal Engineering research at Dalian University of Technology. This will include details of the flumes and large scale wave generation tank.
The seminar and presentation will then outline the use of the BEM (boundary element method) to solve problems involving the interaction of waves and various bodies in the water.
The Reliability-Based Assessment of Existing Bridge Structures: Live Load-Effects Given by Various Australian Design Trucks
The Reliability-Based Assessment of Existing Bridge Structures: Live Load-Effects Given by Various Australian Design Trucks

Introduction
Bridges are considered as an essential part of the transportation network. There are the demands for new bridges and at the same time there are the needs to operate old bridges. In Australia, more than 50% of bridges are over 50 years old. The legal load limits have been continuously pushed to increase from industrial sections by operating longer and heavier vehicles on highways. Most existing bridges, designed according to the design codes at that time, are determined as unsatisfactory bridges because of the failure to satisfy structural requirements based on the current design standards. These may result in the replacement of bridges that are actually performing sufficiently in real locations. These emphasise the need for a better more realistic approach in evaluating the safety of existing bridges.

This presentation will briefly introduce the basic concepts of the main objectives in this research. The improvement of live load models, dynamic load allowance (DLA) and the procedures to achieve better realistic models will be discussed. Finally, the results of load-effects given by various Australian design trucks, analysed by load stepping method, will be compared and presented. The results will be used to determine the effectiveness of Influence Line method in determining peak load-effects for single-span simply-supported bridges and typical 3-span continuous bridges.
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jorge
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02-07-2009, 03:25 PM

AS/NZS 4600:2005
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jorge
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02-07-2009, 03:28 PM

I need the standard AS / NZS 4600:2005.
fz.lola@gmail.com
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shaharbannisha
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19-08-2011, 11:02 AM

from where i get civil engineering related seminar and presentation and reports
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20-08-2011, 10:29 AM

To get more information about the topic "Civil Engineering Seminar Report And Abstract8 " please refer the link below



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11-02-2012, 01:33 PM

to get information about the topic civil engineering full report ,ppt and related topic refer the link bellow

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