Civil Engineering seminar or presentation Abstract And Report
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Analysis of soil classification using normalized piezocone parameters
Analysis of soil classification using normalized piezocone parameters

Introduction
The number of variables which influence cone tip resistance, penetration pore pressures, and CPT sleeve friction typically exceed the range of variables covered by databases of sites used for calibration of correlations for soil classification charts. Therefore, it is important to understand the mechanisms which influence piezocone parameters during the development of design recommendations. Studies have shown that soil strength, and piezocone resistance, are primarily controlled by

(i) initial soil state;
(ii) critical state friction angle;
(iii) degree of consolidation during loading, as well as
(iv) soil stiffness.

To assess these effects on soil classification by piezocone, results of cavity expansion analyses, large strain finite element analyses, variable rate penetration tests in centrifuge clay and silty clay specimens, variable rate penetration tests in natural clay specimens, and a database of field tests sites are compared. This presentation focuses on separating the influence of yield stress ratio from that of partial consolidation on normalized CPTU parameters, which both tend to increase Q and decrease the pore pressure parameter (Bq=Du2/qcnet). The resulting recommended classification chart is significantly different from existing charts, and implies that assessment of data in Q-Du2/s'v0 space is superior to Q-Bq space when evaluating piezocone data for a range of soil types. Still, there are zones of overlap for silty soils and heavily overconsolidated clays, thus requiring that information supplementary to Q and Du2/s'v0 be obtained in unfamiliar geologies, including: variable rate penetration tests, dissipation tests, CPT friction ratio, or soil sampling.

About the presenter

James Schneider received his undergraduate and masters degrees from Georgia Tech, Atlanta, USA, in 1997/1999, respectively. The was followed by 4 years of full time geotechnical consulting in the US for Geosyntec Consultants in Atlanta, and Fugro in California. He arrived in Australia in October 2003 to perform a PhD with Civil Engineering / COFS at UWA, supervised by Prof. Barry Lehane. He will starting a teaching position at The University of Wisconsin-Madison on 15 August 2008.
Long-term behaviour of composite steel-concrete floor beams
Long-term behaviour of composite steel-concrete floor beams

Introduction
The use of steel“concrete composite beams has gained popularity in the last century thanks to its ability to well combine the advantages of both steel and concrete. Composite beams are usually made of a steel girder which is linked to a concrete slab, with or without decking, by means of shear connectors. Composite members exhibit enhanced strength and stiffness when compared to the contribution of their components acting separately, and represent a competitive structural solution in many civil engineering applications, such bridges and buildings. The present Australian limit state standard requires the structure to satisfy both ultimate and serviceability limit states. Serviceability is often the governing criteria for the design of typical composite steel-concrete flooring systems in building applications, which is affected by the time dependent behaviour of the concrete. In this context, this study aims to investigate, both experimentally and numerically, the long-term behaviour of composite steel-concrete members. At present only very limited experimental data is available in the literature and the proposed long-term tests will produce useful benchmark results for the calibration and validation of numerical analysis methods.
A Generalised Cosserat Point Element (CPE) for Isotropic Nonlinear Elastic Materials Including Irregular 3-D Brick and Thin Structures
A Generalised Cosserat Point Element (CPE) for Isotropic Nonlinear Elastic Materials Including Irregular 3-D Brick and Thin Structures

Introduction
A generalised form for the strain energy of inhomogeneous deformations is developed for a 3-D brick Cosserat point element (CPE) which includes full coupling of bending and torsional modes of deformation. The constitutive coefficients, which depend on the reference geometry of the element, are determined by solving eighteen bending problems and six torsion problems on special elements that are parallelepipeds with two right angles. The resulting constitutive coefficients ensure that the strain energy for inhomogeneous deformations remains a positive definite function of the inhomogeneous strain measures for all reference element shapes. A number of example problems are considered which show that the generalised CPE produces results as accurate as enhanced strain and incompatible elements for thin structures and is free of hourglass instabilities typically predicted by these enhanced elements in regions experiencing combined high compression with bending.
From Concept to Industrial Application (Fibre Reinforced Concrete)
From Concept to Industrial Application (Fibre Reinforced Concrete)

Introduction
This talk will describe how an ultra high performance fibre reinforced cement-based composite was conceived and developed based on fundamental micromechanical relationships between the mix/fibre parameters and macromechanical properties (strength, toughness, and stiffness) and how the conflict between strength and toughness inherent to cement-based materials was resolved. It will then describe how the theoretical mixes had to be modified to achieve workable practical mixes and how this led to the patented class of mixes known under the trade name CARDIFRC. Finally, it will describe what changes had to be made to CARDIFRC in order to make it a commercially competitive product and how this latter is being used in place of steel by a leading UK construction company.

Author bio:

Bhushan Lal Karihaloo FIEAus MASME FASCE is a professor of civil, architectural, and environmental engineering and Leader of the Institute of Theoretical, Applied and Computational Mechanics at Cardiff University, and an expert on fracture mechanics.

Bhushan Lal Karihaloo received his Bachelor of Science (Engineering) degree with First Class Honours and Gold Medal from the University of Ranchi, Master of Technology in Structural Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, Doctor of Philosophy from Moscow Civil Engineering University, and Doctor of Engineering from the University of Sydney.

Bhushan was a Professor in Civil Engineering at The University of Sydney until leaving in the early 1990s. We welcome Bhushan back for his visit.
Risk Assessment of Light-Frame Residential Construction Subjected to Hurricane and Seismic Hazards
Risk Assessment of Light-Frame Residential Construction Subjected to Hurricane and Seismic Hazards

Introduction
Hurricanes and earthquakes have caused extensive property damage to light-frame residential construction in the past two decades in the United States. In order to improve residential building performance and mitigate losses from hurricane and earthquake hazards, there is an urgent need for better understanding of building performance and improvements in design and evaluation tools. In this presentation, a fragility analysis methodology is developed for assessing the response of light-frame wood construction exposed to extreme hurricane winds and earthquakes. The fragility is a conditional limit state probability, presented as a function of the 3-second gust wind speed (hurricanes) or spectral acceleration at the fundamental period of the building (earthquakes), leading to a relation between damage state probability and the hazard stipulated in ASCE Standard 7. A fully coupled probabilistic framework is proposed to assess reliability of the residential construction through convolution of the structural fragility model with hazard models. Finally, a comparative risk assessment addresses the similarities and differences in competing hurricane and earthquake hazards. The tools above can be used to evaluate new and existing building products, model the uncertainties that are inherent to the prediction of building performance, and manage the risk that is consequent to these uncertainties economically.

Author bio:

Dr. Yue Li joined the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Michigan Technological University as Donald and Rose Ann Tomasini Assistant Professor of Structural Engineering in August 2005. He earned his Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering, with an emphasis in Structural Engineering, from Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia, in August 2005.

Dr. Liâ„¢s research interests include bridge engineering, structural reliability analysis, probabilistic design, natural and man-made hazard mitigation, structural load modeling and combinations of loads, structural health monitoring and condition assessment, performance-based engineering, earthquake engineering, wind engineering, and wood engineering. He received Michigan Tech Research Excellent Fund Award in 2008.

He has published in such journals as Journal of Structural Engineering, Australian Journal of Structural Engineering, Engineering Structures, and Structural Safety. His teaching interests include basic structural engineering, probability, statistical and engineering decision analysis, structural reliability and performance-based structural design. He has worked as a structural engineer for five years, and was involved in the design of new international terminal at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.
Buckling Studies of Thin-Walled Channel Sections under Combined Bending and Shear
Buckling Studies of Thin-Walled Channel Sections under Combined Bending and Shear

Introduction
Thin-walled section members can be subjected to axial force, bending and shear. In the cases of cantilever beams and continuous lapped purlins, where combined bending and shear occur at the purlin section just outside the end of the lap, thin-walled sections may buckle at a lower stress than if only one action was present without the other. The computational modelling of the thin-walled steel sections is implemented by means of a spline finite strip analysis to determine the elastic buckling stresses of channel sections subject to bending and shear alone and interaction relations under combined bending and shear. Both unlipped and lipped channels are studied where the main variables are the flange width, different boundary conditions and shear flow distribution. Comparisons between cases and with classical solutions are included in this presentation.

An introduction of experimental investigation performed at the University of Sydney to understand the interaction of purlins under combined bending and shear is also presented.
Criteria for the Choice of Instructional Media
Criteria for the Choice of Instructional Media

Introduction
The seminar and presentation will list the various media that colleagues draw upon in their teaching.
It will then seek to identify the criteria that colleagues deploy in selecting these media in their teaching.
The ACTIONS model (devised by Tony Bates) will be introduced and used to refine the criteria used for the choice of instructional media to be used in Flexible Learning contexts (text, audio, video, realia and Computer Mediated Communication). Working in small groups, colleagues will select a particular medium and apply the ACTIONS models to it.
Any emerging questions will (hopefully!) be addressed.

About Professor Lockwood

Between 1975 and 2000 Dr Lockwood worked within the Open University (OU) Institute of Educational Technology. During this period he was an Educational Technologist working with OU Course teams and Chairing Teams. During the period he was also Head of the Teaching and Consultancy Centre, Head, Professional Development in Educational Technology programme (PDET) and Deputy Director.

In January 2000 Fred was appointed Head: Learning + Teaching Unit, Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) and Professor of Learning and Teaching. Fred was part of the senior management team within Academic Division and responsible for the realisation of the MMU Learning and Teaching Strategy. In February 2006 Fred was appointed Emeritus Professor in Learning and Teaching. His research interests are broad; they range from psychometric to illuminative studies as reflected in personal and institutional research. They span all phases of course development - from conception and planning and from production and presentation to evaluation.Fred has been appointed Visiting Professor, Lecturer, Expert and Educator to over 20 international institutions of higher education. He has undertaken over 30 national and international consultancies.

In 2006 he was a Visiting Scholar to the Auckland University of Technology and the University of the South Pacific. He undertook consultancies on behalf of the Open University of Malaysia, Indira Gandhi National Open University, Open University of the Philippines and University of Papua New Guinea.

In 2007 he was a Visiting Scholar to the University of Wisconsin, USA and a Visiting Scholar at Monash University, Australia. In 2008 he will be a Visiting Professor at the University of Wisconsin, USA, University of Hong Kong, PRC and the University of Sydney, Australia. In the last twenty years Fred has been invited to be keynote speaker at 26 national and international conferences as well being invited to conduct 20 pre or post conference workshops.

Fred is Series Editor of the Routledge Open and Flexible Learning Series. In 2008 he expects - the fiftieth book in the Series will have been published; the Series is the largest of its kind in the world. In the period August - December 2007 Fred was Interim President of the Open and Distance Learning Association of Australia. He provides professional advice in the field of open and distance learning to grant awarding bodies and conference organisers. He sits on the Editorial Boards of ten journals.
A Non-Isodimensional Finite-Element Method: Towards a New Type of Adaptivity
A Non-Isodimensional Finite-Element Method: Towards a New Type of Adaptivity

Introduction
Domain dimensionality is one of the most important, and least debated, decisions made prior to finite-element type simulations. The adoption of a specific problem dimension (1D, 2D, 3D or axisymmetric) is often made on grounds of expediency (e.g., software availability, familiarity with specific software systems, computational limitations and so on). Non-isodimensional simulations of stress and field problems remain an exception. One such example is the inclusion of shell elements in 3D stress simulations which exploit the thinness of a structural member in order to simplify the analysis. In all cases, the construction of time-domain non-isodimensional algorithms can pave the way for the derivation of a new kind of adaptivity which can automatically adjust the dimensionality of the problem during the analysis. Such a scheme, which can be labelled d-adaptivity, would interpret a posteriori indicators of dimensionality in order to modify the extent of 1D, 2D and 3D regions in a non-isodimensional model, from one time step to the next. It would lead to a more optimal use of computational resources as in the case, for example, of an advancing wetting front in unsaturated soils reaching a new layer with different flow properties and the dimensionality of transport thus changing in time.

A new Finite Element Method (FEM) for transient flow problems in multiple-scale media is presented. Double or multiple nodes are used to model thin layers, or any set of 1D regions, as a discontinuity of variables and transform their effects into a body load acting at the interface with the rest of the domain. The formulation, called Multiple-Node FEM, offers two advantages. First, it removes the need for meshing and numerical integration along the thin direction and reduces the number of degrees of freedom. Second, it provides the basis for a non-isodimensional FEM which seamlessly combines domains with different dimensions.
The Creep Behaviour of Tunnels in Sydney Basin
The Creep Behaviour of Tunnels in Sydney Basin

Introduction
Most tunnels built in Sydney penetrate the Hawkesbury sandstone or the shale that lie beneath the city and are supported by a combined rockbolt and shotcrete lining system. New techniques such as the shotcrete mix design, excavation and construction of such tunnels have been successfully employed. Also we have accumulated much experience of the short-term performance of such tunnels, but we still lack understanding and design methods for the long-term creep behaviour of the tunnel support system. A finite element analysis method SAFEA (Semi-analytical FE Analysis) was developed to study the time-dependent behaviour of the rock, shotcrete and the combined tunnel support system.

Time-dependent creep deformation occurs when shotcrete or rock is under an applied load. This property is modelled by representing the bulk modulus K and shear modulus G of material as logarithmic functions in time. A Laplace transform is used in the three-dimensional finite element analysis program to simplify the governing equations and then the Tablot's inversion is used to get the solution in real time.

Tunnels under different ground conditions and with different fibre reinforced shotcrete linings were modelled. The numerical results show the additional creep deflection of tunnel structures and the stress redistribution in the surrounding rock, shotcrete lining and rockbolt support system over time.
The Plastic Buckling Paradox
The Plastic Buckling Paradox

Introduction
Plastic flow theory is generally considered superior to plastic deformation theory. Nevertheless, plastic flow theory fails to match experimental data in a number of inelastic buckling problems, such as local buckling of plates and torsional buckling of columns, yielding far less reliable results in these cases than the plastic deformation theory. After discussing the principles of plastic flow theory, the seminar and presentation will try to shed some light on this ËœPlastic Buckling Paradoxâ„¢ and will proposes a solution to the problem, which hinges on the determination of the plastic shear stiffness.
Non-local constitutive modelling using damage and breakage mechanics
Non-local constitutive modelling using damage and breakage mechanics

Introduction
It is well known that conventional continuum mechanics lacks a length scale and hence is inadequate to capture correctly the behaviour of solids/structures made of softening materials. To circumvent the problem, special treatments, called regularization techniques, need to be applied to the constitutive modelling as well as the numerical analysis. Different types of regularization, from simple (cohesive crack models, smeared crack models) to more advanced (nonlocal models), can be used. The presentation will give a brief overview about non-local models of integral type and their several aspects in the constitutive modelling using damage and breakage mechanics.
Time dependent behaviour of concrete-filled steel tubes (CFST)
Time dependent behaviour of concrete-filled steel tubes (CFST)

Introduction
Concrete-filled steel tubes (CFST) are becoming a very popular structural solution for both high-rise building and arch bridge applications because of their high compressive strength as well as efficiency in construction. In this context, an accurate prediction of their time-dependent behavior is required especially in view of modern slender structural solutions which might be more influenced by creep and shrinkage effects. In fact, slender CFST systems are prone to instability problems which may be triggered by the increasing deformations caused by time effects.

This study intends to investigate this behaviour both numerically and experimentally.
An Overview of the Centre for Complex Systems Research (CCSR)
An Overview of the Centre for Complex Systems Research (CCSR)

Introduction
This presentation will provide an overview of the Centre for Complex Systems Research (CCSR) and discuss the underlying model that drives the research group from theoretical, methodological and applieed perspective. It will provide one or two examples of the Centre's research and its findings in this area.

The Centre for Complex Systems (CCS) focuses on social networks theory and analytical methods, coordination theory, sociobiology, non linear systems dynamic theory, chaos theory and complexity theory in organisations, complex adaptive systems theory and self-organisation theory and its applications in domains such as computer supported cooperative work; human and computer interactions; modeling disaster preparedness, exploring safety and standard of practice of global mining teams, modeling self organised fraud claims in insurance and finance in capital markets, exploring the effects of social network structure and technology use for the delivery of quality and standards to care for general practitioners, modeling complex and dynamic emergency medical coordination teams, understanding the impact of social networks on innovation and diffusion, and medical and public heath field such as exploring the spread of disease (i.e., STD, AIDS, SARS) through social networks.

The Centre uses methods and analytical techniques from mathematical sociology (i.e., social networks analysis), social anthropology (i.e., interview and field studies), computer science (i.e., information visualisation, graph theoretic approaches and data mining techniques such as clustering) to explore coordination problems in a dynamic, distributed and complex setting.
Tales from a Siberian Journey
Tales from a Siberian Journey

Introduction
Andrew Abel recently undertook an adventure by train from China, across Siberia and into Russia on the famed Trans Siberian Railway. Andrew will tell us the story of his journeys with usual style, charm and flair!
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