Cryonics
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premraj.10
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#1
11-03-2010, 07:35 PM


Someone help me with this topic...

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#2
15-03-2010, 06:17 PM

Cryonics

Cryonics is the low-temperature preservation of humans and animals who can no longer be sustained by contemporary medicine, with the hope that resuscitation may be possible in the future.It is proposed that cryopreserved people might someday be recovered by using highly advanced future technology. The stated rationale for cryonics is that people who are considered dead by current legal or medical definitions may not necessarily be dead according to the more stringent information-theoretic definition of death. Cryonics procedures ideally begin within minutes of cardiac arrest, and use cryoprotectants to prevent ice formation during cryopreservation.



Premises of cryonics:

A central premise of cryonics is that memory, personality, and identity are stored in durable cell structures and patterns within the brain that do not require continuous brain activity to survive. it is known that under certain conditions the brain can stop functioning and still later recover with retention of long-term memory. current cryonics procedures can preserve the anatomical basis of mind, and that this may be sufficient to prevent information-theoretic death until future repairs might be possible.



Obstacles to success:

Preservation injury:

Long-term cryopreservation can be achieved by cooling to near 77.15 Kelvin, the boiling point of liquid nitrogen. It is a common mistaken belief that cells will lyse (burst) due to the formation of ice crystals within the cell, but this only occurs if the freezing rate exceeds the osmotic loss of water to the extracellular space.Vitrification in cryonics is different than vitrification in mainstream cryobiology because vitrification in cryonics is not reversible with current technology.



Ischemic injury:

Ischemia means inadequate or absent blood circulation that deprives tissue of oxygen and nutrients. At least several minutes of ischemia is a typical part of cryonics because of the common legal requirement that cryonics procedures do not begin until after blood circulation stops.The aim is to keep tissues alive after legal death by analogy to conventional medical procedures in which viable organs and tissues are obtained for transplant from legally deceased donors.



Neuropreservation:

Neuropreservation is cryopreservation of the brain, often within the head, with surgical removal and disposal (usually cremation) of the rest of the body.



Financial issues:

Costs of cryonics vary greatly, ranging from $28,000 for cryopreservation by the Cryonics Institute, to $155,000 for whole body cryopreservation for the American Cryonics Society's most expensive plan.



Philosophical and ethical considerations:

Cryonics is based on a view of dying as a process that can be stopped in the minutes, and perhaps hours, following clinical death. If death is not an event that happens suddenly when the heart stops, this raises philosophical questions about what exactly death is. Ethical and theological opinions of cryonics tend to pivot on the issue of whether cryonics is regarded as interment or medicine. If cryonics is interment, then religious beliefs about death and afterlife may come into consideration. Resuscitation may be deemed impossible by those with religious beliefs because the soul is gone, and according to most religions only God can resurrect the dead.



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en.wikipediawiki/Cryonics#Premises_of_cryonics
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abhijith21
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#3
03-07-2010, 10:33 AM

I wAnna more details about cryonics..ande also their presentation also...
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#4
22-02-2011, 04:22 PM


.ppt   Hoffman update - The Ethics of Cryonics.ppt (Size: 668.5 KB / Downloads: 216)
The Ethics of Cryonics:
Outline of talk
1. Definition of ethics
2. Some surprisingly bad examples of ethics from historically venerated sources
3. Some recent ethics thought leaders
4. Ethics of cryonics, why you are worth saving
What is Ethics?
ethics Noun, pl1. a code of behaviour, esp. of a particular group, profession, or individual: business ethics 2. the moral fitness of a decision, course of action, etc. Noun the study of the moral value of human conduct Collins Essential English Dictionary 2nd Edition 2006 © HarperCollins Publishers 2004, 2006
Example of Ethics from Moses Numbers 31:13-18 (English Standard Version 13Moses and Eleazar the priest and all the chiefs of the congregation went to meet them outside the camp. 14And Moses was angry with(A) the officers of the army, the commanders of thousands and the commanders of hundreds, who had come from service in the war. 15Moses said to them, "Have you(B) let all the women live? 16Behold,© these,(D) on Balaam’s advice, caused the people of Israel to act treacherously against the LORD in the incident of(E) Peor, and so(F) the plague came among the congregation of the LORD.
17Now therefore,(G) kill every male among the little ones, and kill every woman who has known man by lying with him. 18But all the young girls who have not known man by lying with him(H) keep alive for yourselves.
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#5
11-03-2011, 03:54 PM

Presented By
P.Madhu sudhan Reddy
Hari Babu. N


.doc   17)Nano Technology.doc (Size: 483.5 KB / Downloads: 93)
Abstract:
Today technology plays a vital role in every aspect of life. Increasing standards in technology in many fields , has taken man today to high esteem. But the present available technologies are unable to interact with the atoms, such a minute particles. Hence Nanotechnology has been developing. Nanotechnology is nothing but a technology which uses atoms with a view to creating a desired product. It has wider applications in all the fields. The
important application is Cryonics.. Cryonics is nothing but an attempt of raising the dead - making them alive. First we preserve the body then by using molecular machines based nanotechnology we could revive the patients by repairing damaged cells.
In this technical paper we would like to discuss cryonics, how the process of cryonics goes on and why nanotechnology is being used and description of molecular machines which has the capability of repairing damaged cells. Therefore Cryonics is an area in which most of the work is to be done in future .
Introduction:
Today technology plays a vital role in every aspect of life. Increasing standards in technology in many fields particularly in medicine, has taken man today to high esteem. Nanotechnology is a new technology that is knocking at the doors. This technology uses atoms with a view to creating a desired product. The term nanotechnology has been a combination of two terms,”nano”and “technology”. The term nano is derived from a Greek word “nanos” which means “dwarf”. Thus nanotechnology is dwarf technology. A nanometer is one billionth of a metre.
Our President A.P.J.Abdul Kalam being a scientist made a note about this technology that nanotechnology would give us an opportunity, if we take appropriate and timely action to become one of the important technological nations in the world.
The main application of nanotechnology is cryonics. Cryonics is nothing but an attempt of raising the dead. Cryonics is not a widespread medical practice and viewed with skepticism by most scientists and doctors today.
History:
The first mention of nanotechnology occurred in a talk given by Richard Feynman in 1959, entitled There’s plenty of Room at the Bottom. Historically cryonics began in 1962 with the publication of “The prospect of immortality” referred by Robert Ettinger, a founder and the first president of the cryonics institute. During 1980’s the extent of the damage from freezing process became much clearer and better known, when the emphasis of the movement began to shift to the capabilities of nanotechnology. Alcor Life Extension Foundation currently preserves about 70 human bodies and heads in Scottsdale, Arizona and the cryonics institute has about the same number of cryonic patients in its Clinton Township, Michigan facility. There are no cryonics service provided outside of the U.S.A. also there are support groups in Europe, Canada, Australia & U.K.
Cryonics:
The word "cryonics" is the practice of freezing a dead body in hopes of someday reviving it. A Cryonics is the practice of cooling people immediately after death to the point where molecular physical decay completely stops, in the expectation that scientific and medical procedures currently being developed will be able to revive them and restore them to good health later. A patient held in such a state is said to be in 'cryonic suspension. Cryonics is the practice of cryopreserving humans and pets (who have recently become legally dead) until the cryopreservation damage can be reversed and the cause of the fatal disease can be cured (including the disease known as aging). However, there is a high representation of scientists among cryonicists. Support for cryonics is based on controversial project and implimentationions of future technologies and of their ability to enable molecular-level repair of tissues and organs.
Cryonics patient prepares for the future:
How an Alcor patient's body is frozen and stored until medical technology can repair the body and revive the patient, or grow a new body for the patient.
Patient declared legally dead
On way to Alcor in Arizona, blood circulation is maintained and patient is injected with medicine to minimise problems with frozen tissue. Cooling of body begun. (If body needs to be flown, blood is replaced with organ preservatives.)
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#6
31-03-2011, 11:52 AM

Presented By
S.prithvi,
Sai amraj,

CRYONICS
Cryonics is a technique designed to save lives and greatly extend lifespan. It involves cooling legally-dead people to liquid nitrogen temperature where physical decay essentially stops, in the hope that future technologically advanced scientific procedures will someday be able to revive them and restore them to youth and good health. A person held in such a state is said to be a "Cryonics does not involve the freezing of dead people. Cryonics involves placing critically ill patients that cannot be treated with contemporary medical technologies in a state of long-term low temperature care to preserve the person until a time when treatments might be available. Similar to such common medical practices as general anesthesia and hypothermic circulatory arrest, cryonics does not require a fundamental paradigm shift in how conventional medicine thinks about biology, physiology, and brain function. Although current cryopreservation methods are not reversible, under ideal circumstances the fine structure that encodes a person’s personality is likely to be preserved. Complete proof of reversible vitrification of human beings would be sufficient, but is not necessary, for acceptance of cryonics as a form of long-term critical care medicine. The current alternative is death; or for persons who are at risk of suffering extensive brain injury, loss of personhood.
For very old and fragile patients, meaningful resuscitation would require reversal of the aging process. Obviously, the objective of cryonics is not to resuscitate patients in a debilitated and compromised condition, but to rejuvenate the patient. Ongoing research in fields such as biogerontology, nanomedicine, and synthetic biology inspire optimism that such treatment will be available in the future. who are at risk of suffering extensive brain injury, loss of personhood.
Many biological specimens have been cryopreserved, stored at liquid nitrogen temperature where all decay ceases, and revived; these include whole insects, many types of human tissue including brain tissue, human embryos which have later grown into healthy children, and a few small mammalian organs. Increasingly more cells, organs and tissues are being reversibly cryopreserved.
The repair capabilities of molecular biology and nanotechnology increasingly point to a future technology that can repair damage due to aging, disease and freezing.
Dogs and monkeys have had their blood replaced with protective solution and cooled to below 0ºC, with subsequent rewarming and revival. Nematode worms have been cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen (-196ºC), and subsequently revived. The procedure involves initial cool-down with use of anticoagulant, removing the blood, and replacing it with a cryoprotectant — a solution that minimizes or eliminates freezing damage. This is followed by further cooling, and then long-term immersion in liquid nitrogen at a temperature of −196ºC. A whole mammal has not yet been cryopreserved to cryogenic temperatures and revived, the progress of science is moving in that direction.
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#7
06-04-2011, 12:45 PM

PRESENTED BY
KAUSHIK.T


.pptx   cryonics.pptx (Size: 514.07 KB / Downloads: 68)
cryonics
ONE WAY TO RAISING THE DEAD?

(NANO TECHNOLOGY)
Introduction
 Nanotechnology is a new technology that uses atoms with a view to creating a desired product.
 The term nanotechnology has been a combination of two terms, ”nano” and “technology”.
 The term nano is derived from a Greek word “nanos” which means “dwarf”. Thus nanotechnology is dwarf technology.
History
 The first mention of nanotechnology occurred in a talk given by Richard Feynman in 1959.
 Historically cryonics began in 1962 with the publication of “The prospect of immortality” referred by Robert Ettinger, a founder and the first president of the cryonics institute.
 There are no cryonics service provided outside of the U.S.A
Cryonics
 A Cryonics is the practice of cooling people immediately after death to the point where molecular physical decay completely stops.
 scientific and medical procedures currently being developed will be able to revive them and restore them to good health later.
 A patient held in such a state is said to be in 'cryonic suspension’.
Cryonics patient prepares for the future
 patient's body is frozen and stored until medical technology can repair the body and revive the patient, or grow a new body for the patient.
Patient declared legally dead
 blood circulation is maintained and patient is injected with medicine to minimise problems with frozen tissue. Coolingof body begun. (If body needs to be flown, blood is replaced with organ preservatives.)
body is cooled to 5 degrees
 Chest opened, blood is replaced with a solution (glycerol, water, other chemicals) that enters the tissues, pushing out water to reduce ice formation.
 In 2 to 4 hours, 60% or more of body water is replaced by glycerol.
Freezing the body
 The patient is placed in cold silicone oil, chilling the body to -79°C.
 Then it's moved to an aluminium pod and slowly cooled over 5 days in liquid nitrogen to -196°C (minus 320° Fahrenheit), then stored.
Actual process starts
 After preserving the body for somedays, they will start the surgery.
 As a part of it, they will apply some chemicals like glycerol and some advanced chemicals to activate the cells of the body.
 . By doing so, 0.2% of the cells in the body will be activated.
 After that they will preserve the body for future applications.
 The cryonists strongly believe that future medicines in 21st century will be useful to rapidly increase those cells that will help to retrieve the dead person back
Financial Issues
 Cryopreservation arrangements can be expensive, currently ranging from $28,000 at the Cryonics Institute to $150,000 at Alcor and the American Cryonics Society.
 The biggest drawback to current practice is a costs issue.
 most cost-effective means of storing a cryopreserved person is in liquid nitrogen, fracturing of the brain occurs, a result of thermal stresses that develop when cooling from −130°C to −196°C (the temperature of liquid nitrogen).
Why only nanotechnology is used in cryonics ?
 "Current medical science does not have the tools to fix damage that occurs at the cellular and molecular level. Nanotechnology is the ultimate miniaturization can achieve.
 Cryonics basically deals with cells, these cells are in the order of nanometers. At present there is no other technology which deals with such minute cells.
 In theory, a nano technology could make our body immune to any present or future infectious disease.
How nanotechnology is used in cryonics?
 MOLECULAR MACHINES could revive patients by repairing damaged cells.
 Computational nano technology includes only the tools and techniques required to model the proposed molecular machines.
 The software required to design and model complex molecular machine is either already available or can be readily develop over the next few years from computer science.
Conclusion
 With the implementation of Cryonics we can get back the life.
 But Cryonics is a area in which most of the work is to be done in future and till now mainly the concept of this area has been proposed.
 So the Scientists are not making long promises for the future of this Cryonics.
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#8
28-07-2011, 10:56 AM


.doc   CRYONICS- CAN SCIENCE CHEAT DEATH[1][1]..doc (Size: 144 KB / Downloads: 53)
ABSTRACT :
Today technology plays a vital role in every aspect of life. Increasing standards in technology in many fields has been taken man today to high esteem. But the present available technologies are unable to interact with atoms, such a minute particles. Hence nanotechnology is used in this context. Nanotechnology is nothing but a technology which uses atoms with a view to creating desired product. It has wider application in all fields, the important application is CRYONICS.
Cryonics is nothing but an attempt of raising the dead – making them alive. In this technical paper we would like to present how the process of cryonics goes on and why nanotechnology is being used and description of molecular machines which has the capability of repairing damaged cells and its effect on Culture, Health, and Longevity. And we also present the philosophical and ethical considerations of cryonics and benefits of supporting cryonics society. Cryonics is an area in which most of the work is to be done in the future.
INTRODUCING CRYONICS:
Cryonics is nothing but an attempt of raising the dead- making them alive. Actually the word “cryonics” is the practice of freezing a dead body in hopes of someday reviving it. A cryonics is the practice of cooling the people immediately after death to the point where the molecular physical decay completely stops, in the expectation that scientific and medical procedures currently being developed will be able to revive them and restore them to good health later. A patient held in such a state is said to be in “cryonic suspension”. There is reason to believe that current cryonics procedures can preserve the anatomical basis of mind. Cryonics works became more effective
PREMISES OF CRYONICS:
The central premise of cryonics is that memory, personality, and identity is stored in cellular structures and chemistry, principally in the brain. While this view is widely accepted in medicine, and brain activity is known to stop and later resume under certain conditions, it is not generally accepted that current methods preserve the brain well enough to permit revival in the future. Cryonics advocates point to studies showing that high concentrations of cryoprotectant circulated through the brain before cooling can prevent structural damage from ice, preserving the fine cell structures of the brain in which memory and identity presumably reside.
HISTORY:
The first mention of nano technology occurred in a talk given by Richard Feynman in 1959, entitled. Historically cryonics began in 1962 with the publication of “THE PROSPECT OF IMMORTALITY”.
Referred by Robert Ettinger, a founder and the first president of CRYONICS INSTITUTE. However, the modern era of cryonics began in 1962 when Michigan College physics teacher Robert Ettinger proposed in a privately published book, The Prospect of Immortality that freezing people may be a way to reach future medical technology. Even though freezing a person is apparently fatal, Ettinger argued that what appears to be fatal today may be reversible in the future.
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17-10-2012, 10:43 AM

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20-12-2012, 12:13 PM

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