E-INTELLIGENCE
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24-12-2009, 07:34 PM


INTRODUCTION
As corporations move rapidly toward deploying e-business
systems, the lack of business intelligence facilities in these systems prevents decisionmakers
from exploiting the full potential of the Internet as a sales, marketing, and
support channel. To solve this problem, vendors are rapidly enhancing their business
intelligence offerings to capture the data flowing through e-business systems and
integrate it with the information that traditional decision-making systems manage and
analyze. These enhanced business intelligence”or e-intelligence”systems may
provide significant business benefits to traditional brick-and-mortar companies as well
as new dot-com ones as they build e-business environments.
Organizations have been successfully using decisionprocessing
products, including data warehouse and business intelligence tools, for the
past several years to optimize day-to-day business operations and to leverage
enterprise-wide corporate data for a competitive advantage. The advent of the Internet
and corporate extranets has propelled many of these organizations toward the use of ebusiness
applications to further improve business efficiency, decrease costs and
increase revenues - and to compete with new dot.com companies appearing in the
marketplace.
The explosive growth in the use of e-business has led to the
need for decision-processing systems to be enhanced to capture and integrate business
information flowing through e-business systems. These systems also need to be able to
apply business intelligence techniques to this captured-business information. These
enhanced decision processing systems, or E-Intelligence, have the potential to provide
significant business benefits to both traditional bricks-and-mortar companies and new
dot.com companies as they begin to exploit the power of e-business processing.


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E-INTELLIGENCE SEMINAR REPORT

INTRODUCTION
As corporations move rapidly toward deploying e-business
systems, the lack of business intelligence facilities in these systems prevents decisionmakers
from exploiting the full potential of the Internet as a sales, marketing, and
support channel. To solve this problem, vendors are rapidly enhancing their business
intelligence offerings to capture the data flowing through e-business systems and
integrate it with the information that traditional decision-making systems manage and
analyze. These enhanced business intelligence”or e-intelligence”systems may
provide significant business benefits to traditional brick-and-mortar companies as well
as new dot-com ones as they build e-business environments.
Organizations have been successfully using decisionprocessing
products, including data warehouse and business intelligence tools, for the
past several years to optimize day-to-day business operations and to leverage
enterprise-wide corporate data for a competitive advantage. The advent of the Internet
and corporate extranets has propelled many of these organizations toward the use of ebusiness
applications to further improve business efficiency, decrease costs and
increase revenues - and to compete with new dot.com companies appearing in the
marketplace.
The explosive growth in the use of e-business has led to the
need for decision-processing systems to be enhanced to capture and integrate business
information flowing through e-business systems. These systems also need to be able to
apply business intelligence techniques to this captured-business information. These
enhanced decision processing systems, or E-Intelligence, have the potential to provide
significant business benefits to both traditional bricks-and-mortar companies and new
dot.com companies as they begin to exploit the power of e-business processing.
1
E-INTELLIGENCE FOR BUSINESS
E-intelligence systems provide internal business users,
trading partners, and corporate clients rapid and easy access to the e-business
information, applications, and services they need in order to compete effectively and
satisfy customer needs. They offer many business benefits to organizations in
exploiting the power of the Internet. For example, e-intelligence systems give the
organization the ability to:
¢Integrate e-business operations into the traditional business environment, giving
business users a complete view of all corporate business operations and information.
¢Help business users make informed decisions based on accurate and consistent ebusiness
information that is collected and integrated from e-business applications.
This business information helps business users optimize Web-based offerings
(products offered, pricing and promotions, service and support, and so on) to match
marketplace requirements and analyze business performance with respect to
competitors and the organizationâ„¢s business-performance objectives.
¢Assist e-business applications in profiling and segmenting e-business customers.
Based on this information, businesses can personalize their Web pages and the
products and services they offer.
¢Extend the business intelligence environment outside the corporate firewall, helping
the organization share internal business information with trading partners. Sharing this
information will let it optimize the product supply chain to match the demand for
products sold through the Internet and minimizes the costs of maintaining inventory.
¢Extend the business intelligence environment outside the corporate firewall to key
corporate clients, giving them access to business information about their accounts.
With this information, clients can analyze and tune their business relationships with
other organization, improving client service and satisfaction.
2
¢Link e-business applications with business intelligence and collaborative processing
applications, allowing internal and external users to seamlessly move among different
systems.
INTELLIGENT E-SERVICES
The building blocks of new, sophisticated, intelligent data
warehousing applications are now intelligent e-services. An e-service is any asset
made available via the Internet to drive new revenue streams or create new
efficiencies. What makes e-services valuable is not only the immediacy of the service,
but also the intelligence behind the service. While traditional data warehousing meant
simple business rules, simple queries and pro-active work to take advantage of the
Web, E-Intelligence is much more sophisticated and enables the Web to work on our
behalf. Combining intelligence with e-services promises exciting business
opportunities.
3
E-INTELLIGENCE REQUIREMENTS
An e-intelligence system builds on and extends existing
business intelligence tools and applications, including enterprise information portals
(EIPs). Figure 1 outlines the architecture of an e-intelligence system and provides
examples of the business intelligence capabilities an organization should seek in such
a system, including:
¢One-to-one e-marketing analysis applications that customize and personalize
information, applications, services, and products offered to consumers and clients via
the Internet
¢Content, customer, and merchandise-analysis applications that track and analyze
how users navigate the organizationâ„¢s e-business sites and use applications to buy
products
¢Channel and cross-channel analysis and campaign applications that measure and
analyze the success of the Internet as a sales, marketing, and services channel
¢Supply-chain analysis applications that let the organization work with trading
partners in optimizing the product supply chain to match the demand for products sold
through the Internet
¢A simple and integrated e-intelligence Web interface to give internal and external
Web users and applications secure, managed access to the organizationâ„¢s business
information, applications, and services
¢Demand-driven business intelligence gathering and analysis, and real-time
decisions and recommendations as consumers and clients interact with e-business
systems via the Internet.
4
Figure1.E-Intelligence Processing
5
FRAMEWORK FOR E-INTELLIGENCE
Figure 2 introduces a business and technology framework
for constructing an integrated e-intelligence operating environment. The framework
has two key components: a business intelligence system and an EIP.
Figure2: E-Intelligence Framework
6
Business intelligence processing ( Figure 3) involves using
extract-transform-load (ETL) tools or in-house developed applications to extract data
from source back-office operational systems (ERP, supply-chain management, and
legacy applications, for example), and then transforming and integrating the extracted
data into useful business information for corporate decision-making. Usually,
enterprises would store this business information in a data warehouse.
Figure 3 Features of an enhanced business intelligence system for e-business.
With a data warehouse, decision-makers can use online
analytic processing (OLAP) tools and analytic applications to analyze the information
about current business operations and identify ways of reducing costs and increasing
profits and revenues. This analysis typically comprises the following steps:
7
¢Track key performance indicators (KPIs) to monitor trends and detect changes in
business patterns. This process may include, for example, monitoring sales and profits
or the progress of a new sales campaign.
¢Analyze in detail when and why a particular KPI changed.
¢Model potential business improvements to determine their impact on business; for
example, run financial business models or use a data mining tool to profile and
segment customers for a new sales campaign.
¢Modify business operations to incorporate the decisions and actions made as a result
of business-intelligence processing.
A business intelligence system gives its users the business
information they need to make informed business decisions. These decisions often
result in changes to back-office operations”for example, the introduction of new
products or changes to product pricing. These decisions (and associated actions) are
typically made by users interacting via collaborative processing documents such as
email and presentations. When e-business is involved, this ad hoc, manual approach to
closing the loop from business intelligence systems back to operational systems is
too slow, and faster, more automated methods are required to support e-business
operations.
An enterprise could also use the output from a business
intelligence system to drive front-office operations. One component that plays a
pivotal role here is a campaign management application, which uses business
information to develop and manage new marketing campaigns. These campaigns may
draw on a variety of sales channels, including direct sales, direct mail, outbound call
centers, email, fax, and kiosks; e-business systems offer an additional sales channel.
As a new sales campaign progresses, the enterprise can use the
business intelligence system to analyze front-office data or a campaign management
application to fine-tune the current campaign and provide valuable information for
8
future campaigns. Information from external information providers may also be
input into the business intelligence system to supplement existing corporate customer
and marketing data in areas such as competitive and marketplace analysis.
Front-office systems are a valuable source of data for
analyzing and thus improving other aspects of company operations, including product
quality and the effectiveness of inbound call centers that provide customer and
product support and services. But as with back-office operational systems, the loop
from business intelligence systems back to the front office is currently closed
manually through collaborative processing.
9
ROLE OF EIP
Information flow from back- and front-office operational
applications, to business intelligence and collaborative processing systems, and back
to operational systems can be thought of as a closed-loop information supply chain.
To obtain a complete and accurate picture of a companyâ„¢s business operations, users
must be able to access that complete information supply chain. EIPs are emerging as a
potential solution to this problem.
An EIP (see Figure 4) gives the organizations internal users
a single Web-based interface to business information and to the applications that
produce business information, regardless of where they reside.
A user can personalize the information and applications
viewed through an EIP to match the requirements and authorization level of each
business user, whether an executive, business analyst, or clerical assistant. An EIP
also customizes information and application access to suit the userâ„¢s role. For
example, an EIP could give a business analyst in a marketing department a view of the
information required to launch a new marketing campaign. This information could
include analyses of customer profitability and past campaigns stored in a business
intelligence system, marketing collateral managed by a collaborative processing
system, and competitive marketing data contributed by an external information
provider.
10
Figure4:An Enterprise Information Portal for E-business
Impact of E-Business
The Web is truly a valuable source of business
information. Information stored on Web servers on the public Internet are a potential
data source for a data warehouse, or at least can be accessed from an EIP.
Furthermore, as corporations begin using Internet commerce sites as sales and
marketing channels, the associated business-to-consumer e-business systems become
an additional source of information for business-intelligence processing. The source
data here may be stored in conventional database and file systems, but may also come
from Web server logs or even the Web clickstream as users interact with e-business
applications. Thus, business intelligence systems not only need to be able to extract
new types of data, but also handle the potentially huge data volumes involved.
11
When data in business-to-consumer systems is extracted to
the data warehouse, business users can analyze it using OLAP tools and analytic
applications. This analysis is a crucial step in the optimization of e-business operations
and the evaluation of the Internet as a sales channel.
Using the Internet as a sales channel offers significant
benefits; for example, products can be brought to market much faster and at a much
lower cost. Selling through the Internet, however, is very competitive, and the
organization must be able to react rapidly to consumer requirements and changing
marketplace conditions. Four key success factors are involved here: The enterprise
must optimize its product supply chain to match consumer demand; itâ„¢s business users
have to make business decisions more rapidly, possibly in real time; service and
support are key differentiators; and because of the high rate of technology change, the
e-intelligence system must have an open, scalable infrastructure.
Optimizing the Product Supply Chain
The challenge in any consumer environment is to satisfy
consumer demand without incurring the costs of oversupply (excess inventory). If an
organization is typical, it has been using business intelligence systems and their
associated data warehouses for years to analyze sales data and optimize product
supply and inventory. The enterprise can apply these techniques equally well when
selling products through Internet commerce servers. One obvious advantage of the
Internet is that it consists of a single virtual storefront, which is easier to manage and
supply than multiple physical stores.
The low entry cost of employing the Internet as a sales and
marketing channel, however, is creating a more competitive environment and forcing
retail prices down. This price pressure in turn forces companies to fine-tune their
profit margins and product supply chains. One way to rapidly and efficiently do so is
12
to let business users and external trading partners tap the internal closed-loop
information supply chain described here. With this approach, the company can share
business information and work cooperatively to reduce costs and optimize profit
margins.
The simplest approach to supplying business information to
end users in trading partners is via an EIP. With an EIP, the enterprise can customize,
personalize, and control the information flowing among trading organizations across
corporate extranets, or even the Internet. An EIP is also useful for controlling
information flow between clients in nonretail situations. An insurance company could,
for example, let key clients view and analyze claims history information via an EIP,
and then, if appropriate, use the EIP to switch from the business intelligence
environment to the e-business environment to modify insurance coverage.
Realtime Decision-Making
Closing the loop between business intelligence and
operational systems has traditionally been done manually using collaborative
processing documents. However, in the e-business environment, a manual approach to
decision-making can be inadequate, in which case a more dynamic and automated
process is required. One example here is that the enterprise may want to dynamically
control the Web pages displayed to potential e-business customers. The decisions in
this situation could be based on parameters such as the buying power of each customer
and the types of products in which they may be interested. Another example is where
the customer expects an immediate decision when using the e-business application.
This situation could occur, for example, when a customer applies for a new credit card
or requests a credit upgrade. The competitive nature of the Internet requires companies
to react immediately to such requests or risk losing the customer to a competitor.
13
This need to make rapid decisions leads to the notion that
our business intelligence systems must operate in real time. This realtime
requirement, however, has several flavors. Returning to the credit card example,
assuming that a customer requests an upgrade to a platinum credit card, he or she has
been with the financial institution for one year, and that the decision to upgrade the
customer is based on a three-year return on investment (ROI). To make this decision,
the e-business application will need to determine the existing one-year ROI of the
customer, and predict”based on the customer™s profile”the likely remaining twoyear
ROI. To do so, the e-business application will need to do two things:
¢Access data warehouse summarized data in real time to retrieve the one-year ROI
for the customer, calculate in real time the one-year ROI from detailed warehouse
data, or extract in real time the required data from operational systems
¢Profile the customer and run a business model that predicts a two-year ROI in real
time for a customer with that profile. In some cases, the business model itself and its
associated business rules may have to be built or modified in real time.
This example demonstrates several aspects of realtime
processing”including the need to make decisions, access and analyze data warehouse
information, extract data from operational and e-business systems, and build business
models and rules in real time. Realtime processing can also involve getting data from
external systems”to obtain marketing or customer data from an external information
provider, for example
Thus there is a manual and a realtime approach to
corporate decision-making. To summarize, the former involves business users
employing business intelligence systems to manually analyze business information,
and then manually feeding business decisions back to the operational and e-business
environments using a collaborative processing system or EIP. The latter involves an
event-driven e-business or analytic application that analyzes business information and
14
makes automated business decisions in real time. There are, however, other options
between these two extremes. A possible middle-of-the-road approach could be
supported by an analytic application that detects a certain business event (a sudden
change in stock values, for example) and then employs a business model and
associated business rules to automatically analyze business information, and alert and
make recommendations to business users about potential business actions.
E-Intelligence Infrastructure
Given the large number of users and amount of data
involved in e-business processing, this infrastructure must provide good performance,
reliability, and scalability if the organization is to survive in this highly competitive
approach to sales, marketing, and support. Also, given the high rate of change in this
area, the framework must support industry standards where they exist and be open so
that organizations can plug in different vendor products as their requirements change.
An e-intelligence system not only enables business
intelligence techniques to be applied to the e-business environment, but also adds
capabilities not currently available in the traditional business intelligence
environment: namely, realtime analysis and decision making.
15
CASE STUDY
Outpost.com
Outpost.com is known for its radical commercials. The Eintelligence
efforts of the online retailer of PCs, consumer electronics, and other goods
are as leading-edge as its advertising.
Outpost.com gathers clickstream data from its Web
environment and transaction data from its order-processing, inventory, and shipping
systems, then feeds it all into an Oracle8 database. The Web server generates some 3
million to 5 million clickstream records each day, while the transaction/inventory
system creates another 1 million records. Software from Sagent Technology Inc. then
pulls data from the Oracle system and loads it into one of nearly two dozen data marts
running on Microsoft SQL Server 7.0.
Managers and business analysts at Outpost.com (owned by
Cyberian Outpost Inc. of Kent, Conn.) use the subject-specific data marts--including
demand/orders, customers, shipping, returns, and inventory/purchasing--to analyze
aspects of Outpost.com's business. Inventory managers, for example, can determine
how certain products are selling or how well Outpost.com's suppliers are meeting
shipping schedules.
Outpost.com's marketing staff uses the data to segment
customers based on the kinds of products they buy, or combines it with demographic
data from Profile America List Company Inc. to build customer profiles. Outpost.com
16
identifies by name people who have purchased products or have registered with its
Web site. Electronic cookies identify repeat visitors to its Web site. Analysis tools
from SAS Institute Inc. segment customers according to criteria such as profitability,
based on how frequently they return to the site and what kinds of products they buy.
A major use for the collected intelligence is developing
targeted E-mail marketing campaigns. Such campaigns generate a 10% response rate,
compared with the industry average of 2% to 3%. The company also uses the data to
perform return-on-investment analysis "on everything," including individual products,
E-mail campaigns, and TV and radio ads.
Outpost.com has other applications in its E-intelligence
toolkit. The company uses DataSage Inc.'s NetCustomer to identify customer buying
patterns and trends, for example, and Rubric Inc.'s Enterprise Marketing Automation
software to manage its E-mail campaigns.
Outpost.com is adding personalization capabilities to its
Web site using BroadVision Inc.'s One-to-One customer-relationship marketing
software. Initially, special offers, discounts, and promotions will be based on
analyzing which pages a Web-site visitor looked at during previous visits without
making a purchase. In the future, it will be able to provide those capabilities in real
time--making offers to customers as they surf the site.
17
CONCLUSION
Presently the internet and e-Business are growing at an
astonishing rate. As the size of the internet increases its reach and thus its business
potential also increases. There will be tremendous competition an all dotcom
companies to stay ahead. In such a fiercely competitive marketplace e-Intelligence
solutions will become a necessity to stay ahead. Future e-Intelligence techniques will
be aimed at optimizing whole web content depending on users.
18
REFERENCES
1] e-intelligence.hp.com
2] eintelligence.inc.com
3] techguide.com
4] ixquick.com
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please read topicideashow-to-eintelligence-seminar and presentation-report for more about E-INTELLIGENCE
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E-INTELEGENCE
introduction

Business intelligence tools – technology that allows decision makers in an organization to access, analyze, and share corporate information.
• E-business applications – using the internet as the basis for interacting with customers, suppliers, and other business partners.
These two technologies combine to form “e-business intelligence” applications, i.e customers, suppliers, and partners of an organization access and analyze information stored in its corporate databases.
E-Business Applications
1. order : On the e-business application the e-Fashion customers place orders via the internet.
2.Query : Once customers have carried out a series of purchases, the “query” button allows them to examine their transaction history and others details
3. catalog : The “catalog” button lets customers specify product features or attributes as search criteria for the products they wish to order.
Transactions Over the Web
The customers place a sales order over the internet it is summarized on a daily or weekly basis.
transaction system are used primarily by sales analysis, financial controllers, and marketing staff.
There would be a limited number of such transactions for any individual customer. With business-to-business commerce in the real world, however, the number of individual transactions may be large, with a complex set of different items being ordered.
Inquiring Online About Transaction History
Once customers have a history of transactions, they typically want to be able to list and analyze these transactions. Today, this information is delivered through the mail or SMS
For companies looking to expand their e-business presence and provide better customer service, this area can be easier to implement and give a greater immediate return on investment than converting existing systems to allow the purchases themselves over the web.
The Health Care Industry
Here 3.1 billion distributor of medical supplies. The company distributes over 130,000 different products from 1,400 suppliers – to over 4,000 hospitals and clinics. They have implemented an application called WISDOM, based on the WEBINTELLIGENCE™ product from Business Objects, that gives hospitals online access to the customers data warehouse via the web.
Information Sales: Care Management Systems
Care Management Systems (CMS) is a healthcare information system that provides software systems and educational services to healthcare professionals and physicians to analyze and identify ways to improve clinical outcome and care process. Executives, managers, and healthcare professionals can use CMS applications to obtain a better understanding of their costs and identify areas where they could improve care.
Profiling and Marketing Analysis
Today’s organizations are striving to use the new possibilities offered by internet and business
intelligence technology to know their customers better. Let’s take a look at two examples of how e-business and business intelligence interact in the area of profiling and marketing analysis.
Net Statistics
In addition to traditional marketing analysis based on customer transactions and demographics, the web can record mouse clicks and navigational choices, letting organizations build more robust web profiles of their clients and prospects, recording their interests and what they might be likely to buy. The recording of users’ navigational habits on the web opens up a whole new area called net statistics.
Campaign Analysis
Marketing organizations are responsible for implementing and running promotional campaigns designed to generate incremental business for other organizations. Service bureaus that provide campaign management are improving customer service by putting business intelligence solutions directly into the hands of their customers via the internet. Their customers use the tools to both analyze the performance of current campaigns and to help build better models for future campaigns.
Creating Promotional Offers
The users of e-business intelligence query applications typically represent an extremely targeted group of individuals. i.e the users are the purchasing agents of hospitals and other care providers.
Each time these users access their reports over the web, i.e actively engaged in considering their purchasing choices, and there is an opportunity to give them news and promotions about medical products that they may be interested in.
Conclusion
E-business is a large, fast growing industry, and organizations are looking for fast, effective ways to implement e-business systems. While placing orders over the web has been the most visible area of e-business, a complete e-business application requires a number of other features that rely on the use of business intelligence technology.
These “e-business intelligence” applications, that give customers, suppliers, and partners controlled access to existing internal information systems, allow organizations to move quickly into the e-business arena, gain competitive advantage, and in the process exploit their existing data warehousing investments.
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