Estimation tool with Use Case Point Approach
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10-02-2010, 07:35 AM



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Project Estimation tool with Use Case Point Approach
Introduction
Object-oriented applications frequently rely on Use Cases to describe the business processes of a software application. Since use cases consist of the strategic goals and scenarios that provide value to a business domain, they can also provide insight into an applicationâ„¢s complexity. Deriving a reliable estimate of the size and effort an application needs, is possible by examining the actors and scenarios of a use case. Use Case Points is a project and implimentation estimation method that employs a project and implimentationâ„¢s use cases to produce an accurate estimate of a project and implimentationâ„¢s size and effort.
Use Case Points
Use case modeling is an accepted and widespread technique to capture the business processes and requirements of a software application. Since they provide the functional scope of the application, analyzing their contents provides valuable insight into the effort and size needed to design and implement the application. In general, applications with large, complicated use cases take more effort to design and implement than small applications with less complicated use cases. Moreover, the time to complete the application is affected by:
¢ The number of steps to complete the use case.
¢ The number and complexity of the actors.
¢ The technical requirements of the use case such as concurrency, security and performance.
¢ Various environmental factors such as the development teams experience and knowledge.
Use Case Points (UCP) is an estimation method that provides the ability to estimate an applicationâ„¢s size and effort from its use cases. Based on work by Gustav Karner in 1993, UCP analyzes the use case actors, scenarios and various technical and environmental factors and abstracts them into an equation.
The equation is composed of four variables:
1. Technical Complexity Factor (TCF).
2. Environment Complexity Factor (ECF).
3. Unadjusted Use Case Points (UUCP).
4. Productivity Factor (PF).
Each variable is defined and computed separately, using perceived values and various constants. The complete equation is:
UCP = TCP * ECF * UUCP * PF
The necessary steps to generate the estimate based on the UCP method are:
1. Determine and compute the Technical Factors.
2. Determine and compute the Environmental Factors.
3. Compute the Unadjusted Use Case Points.
4. Determine the Productivity Factor.
5. Compute the product of the variables.
Technical Complexity Factors
Thirteen standard technical factors exist to estimate the impact on productivity that various technical issues have on an application. Each factor is weighted according to its relative impact. A weight of 0 indicates the factor is irrelevant and the value 5 means that the factor has the most impact.
Technical Factor Description Weight
T1 Distributed system 2
T2 Performance 1
T3 End User Efficiency 1
T4 Complex internal Processing 1
T5 Reusability 1
T6 Easy to install 0.5
T7 Easy to use 0.5
T8 Portable 2
T9 Easy to change 1
T10 Concurrent 1
T11 Special security features 1
T12 Provides direct access for third parties 1
T13 Special user training facilities are required 1
Figure 1: Technical Factors.
For each project and implimentation, the technical factors are evaluated by the development team and assigned a value from 0 to 5 according to their perceived complexity multithreaded apps. require more skill and time than single threaded applications, for example, as do reusable apps. A perceived complexity of 0 means the technical factor is irrelevant for this project and implimentation; 3 is average; 5 means it has strong influence.
Each factors weight is multiplied by its perceived complexity to produce its calculated factor. The calculated factors are summed to produce the Total Factor.
So, using sample perceived complexity values, the Technical Total Factor might be computed as follows:
Technical Factor Description Weight Perceived Complexity Calculated Factor (weight*perceived complexity)>
T1 Distributed System 2 5 10
T2 Performance 1 4 4
T3 End User Efficiency 1 2 2
T4 Complex internal Processing 1 4 4
T5 Reusability 1 2 2
T6 Easy to install 0.5 5 2
T7 Easy to use 0.5 3 2
T8 Portable 2 3 6
T9 Easy to change 1 3 3
T10 Concurrent 1 2 2
T11 Special security features 1 2 2
T12 Provides direct access for third parties 1 5 5
T13 Special user training facilities are required 1 3 3
Total Factor 47
Figure 2: Calculating the Technical Total Factor.
In Figure 2, the Total Factor is 47 derived by summing all the calculated factors. To produce the final TCF, two constants are computed with the Total Factor. The complete formula to compute the TCF is as follows:
TCF = 0.6 + (.01*Total Factor). For Figure 1, the TCF = 1.07
Environmental Complexity Factors
Environmental Complexity estimates the impact on productivity that various environmental factors have on an application. Each environmental factor is evaluated and weighted according to its perceived impact and assigned a value between 0 and 5. A rating of 0 means the environmental factor is irrelevant for this project and implimentation; 3 is average; 5 means it has strong influence.
Environmental Factor Description Weight
E1 Familiarity with UML 1.5
E2 Application Experience 0.5
E3 Object Oriented Experience 1
E4 Lead analyst capability 0.5
E5 Motivation 1
E6 Stable Requirements 2
E7 Part-time workers -1
E8 Difficult Programming language 2
Figure 3: Example Environmental Factors.
Each factorâ„¢s weight is multiplied by its perceived complexity to produce its calculated factor. The calculated factors are summed to produce the Total Factor.
Using sample values for perceived impact, the Environmental Total Factor might be computed as:
Environmental Factor Description Weight Perceived Impact Calculated Factor
(weight*perceived complexity)
E1 Familiarity with UML 1.5 4 6
E2 Application Experience 0.5 2 1
E3 Object Oriented Experience 1 5 5
E4 Lead analyst capability 0.5 2 1
E5 Motivation 1 1 1
E6 Stable Requirements 2 5 10
E7 Part-time workers -1 0 0
E8 Difficult Programming language 2 1 2
Total Factor 26
Figure 4: Calculating the Environmental Total Factor.
In Figure 4, the Total Factor is 26 derived by summing all the calculated factors. To produce the final ECF, two constants are computed with the Total Factor. The complete formula to compute the ECF is as follows:
ECF = 1.4 + (-0.03*Total Factor). For Figure 4, the ECF = 0.62
Unadjusted Use Case Points (UUCP)
Unadjusted Use Case Points are computed based on two computations:
1. The Unadjusted Use Case Weight (UUCW) based on the total number of activities (or steps) contained in all the use case Scenarios.
2. The Unadjusted Actor Weight (UAW) based on the combined complexity of all the use cases Actors.
UUCW
Individual use cases are categorized as Simple, Average or Complex, and weighted depending on the number of steps they contain - including alternative flows.
Use Case Type Description Weight
Simple A simple user interface and touches only a single database entity; its success scenario has 3 steps or less; its implementation involves less than 5 classes. 5
Average More interface design and touches 2 or more database entities; between 4 to 7 steps; its implementation involves between 5 to 10 classes. 10
Complex Involves a complex user interface or processing and touches 3 or more database entities; over seven steps; its implementation involves more than 10 classes. 15
Figure 5: Use Case Categories.
The UUCW is computed by counting the number of use cases in each category, multiplying each category of use case with its weight and adding the products.
Use Case Type Description Weight Number of Use Cases Result
Simple A simple user interface and touches only a single database entity; its success scenario has 3 steps or less; its implementation involves less than 5 classes. 5 8 40
Average More interface design and touches 2 or more database entities; between 4 to 7 steps; its implementation involves between 5 to 10 classes. 10 12 120
Complex Involves a complex user interface or processing and touches 3 or more database entities; over seven steps; its implementation involves more than 10 classes. 15 4 60
Total UUCW 220
Figure 6: Computing UUCW.
UAW
In a similar manner, the Actors are classified as Simple, Average or Complex based on their interactions.
Actor Type Description Weight
Simple The Actor represents another system with a defined API. 1
Average The Actor represents another system interacting through a protocol, like TCP/IP. 2
Complex The Actor is a person interacting via an interface. 3
Figure 7: Actor Classifications.
The UAW is calculated by counting the number of actors in each category, multiplying each total by its specified weighting factor, and then adding the products.
Actor Type Description Weight Number of Actors Result
Simple The Actor represents another system with a defined API 1 8 8
Average The Actor represents another system interacting through a protocol, like TCP/IP 2 12 24
Complex The Actor is a person interacting via an interface. 3 4 12
Total UAW 44
Figure 8: Computing UAW.
Finally, the UUCP is computed by adding the UUCW and the UAW. For the sample data used in the figures, the UUCP = 220 + 44 = 264.
Productivity Factor
The Productivity Factor (PF) is a ratio of the number of man hours per use case point based on past project and implimentations. If no historical data has been collected, a figure between 15 and 30 is suggested by industry experts. A typical value is 20.
Final Calculation
The Use Case Points is determined by multiplying all the variables:
UCP = TCP * ECF * UUCP * PF
For the sample values used in this article:
UCP = 1.07 * 0.62 * 264 * 20 = 3502.752 or 3503 hours.
Dividing the UCP by 40 hours (for one man work week) = 88 man-weeks. Therefore, for the sample values in this article, it would take one developer 88 weeks (or about 22 months) to complete the application.
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