Fast IP Network Recovery using Multiple Routing Configurations
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#1
15-10-2010, 10:34 AM


Prepared by:
Amund Kvalbein
Audun Fosselie Hansen
Tarik
Stein Gjessing
Olav Lysne


Abstract

As the Internet takes an increasingly central role in our communications infrastructure, the slow convergence of routing protocols after a network failure becomes a growing problem. To assure fast recovery from link and node failures in IP networks, we present a new recovery scheme called Multiple Routing Configurations (MRC). MRC is based on keeping additional routing information in the routers, and allows packet forwarding to continue on an alternative output link immediately after the detection of a failure. Our proposed scheme guarantees recovery in all single failure scenarios, using a single mechanism to handle both link and node failures, and without knowing the root cause of the failure. MRC is strictly connectionless, and assumes only destination based hop-by-hop forwarding. It can be implemented with only minor changes to existing solutions. In this paper we present MRC, and analyze its performance with respect to scalability, backup path lengths, and load distribution after a failure.


INTRODUCTION

In recent years the Internet has been transformed from a special purpose network to an ubiquitous platform for a wide range of everyday communication services. The demands on Internet reliability and availability have increased accordingly. A disruption of a link in central parts of a network has the potential to affect hundreds of thousands of phone conversations or TCP connections, with obvious adverse effects. The ability to recover from failures has always been a central design goal in the Internet. IP networks are intrinsically robust, since IGP routing protocols like OSPF are designed to update the forwarding information based on the changed topology after a failure. This re-convergence assumes full distribution of the new link state to all routers in the network domain. When the new state information is distributed, each router individually calculates new valid routing tables. This network-wide IP re-convergence is a time consuming process, and a link or node failure is typically followed by a period of routing instability. During this period, packets may be dropped due to invalid routes. This phenomenon has been studied in both IGP and BGP context , and has an adverse effect on real-time applications . Events leading to a re-convergence have been shown to occur frequently, and are often triggered by external routing protocols. Much effort has been devoted to optimizing the different steps of the convergence of IP routing, i.e., detection, dissemination of information and shortest path calculation, but the convergence time is still too large for applications with real time demands . A key problem is that since most network failures are short lived , too rapid triggering of the reconvergence process can cause route flapping and increased network instability.

The IGP convergence process is slow because it is reactive and global. It reacts to a failure after it has happened, and it involves all the routers in the domain. In this paper we present a new scheme for handling link and node failures in IP networks. Multiple Routing Configurations (MRC) is proactive and local, which allows recovery in the range of milliseconds. MRC allows packet forwarding to continue over pre-configured alternative next-hops immediately after the detection of the failure. Using MRC as a first line of defense against network failures, the normal IP convergence process can be put on hold. This process is then initiated only as a consequence of non-transient failures. Since no global rerouting is performed, fast failure detection mechanisms like fast hellos or hardware alerts can be used to trigger MRC without compromising network stability. MRC guarantees recovery from any single link or node failure, which constitutes a large majority of the failures experienced in a network.
The main idea of MRC is to use the network graph and the associated link weights to produce a small set of backup network configurations. The link weights in these backup configurations are manipulated so that for each link and node failure, and regardless of whether it is a link or node failure, the node that detects the failure can safely forward the incoming packets towards the destination. MRC assumes that the network uses shortest path routing and destination based hop-by-hop forwarding. In the literature, it is sometimes claimed that the node failure recovery implicitly addresses link failures too, as the adjacent links of the failed node can be avoided. This is true for intermediate nodes, but the destination node in a network path must be reachable if operative (“The last hop problem”,). MRC solves the last hop problem by strategic assignment of link weights between the backup configurations.


for more details, please visit
folk.uio.no/amundk/infocom06.pdf
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#2
15-11-2010, 01:41 PM

hi
go through the following threads for more details.

topicideashow-to-need-help-in-coding-multiple-routing-configurations-for-fast-ip-network-recovery
topicideashow-to-multiple-routing-configurations-for-fast-ip-network-recovery
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KUMARASAMY
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#3
06-08-2011, 06:36 PM

java code for multiple routing configration using fast ip recovery
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#4
08-08-2011, 11:10 AM


To get more information about the topic " Fast IP Network Recovery using Multiple Routing Configurations" please refer the link below
topicideashow-to-need-help-in-coding-multiple-routing-configurations-for-fast-ip-network-recovery
topicideashow-to-multiple-routing-configurations-for-fast-ip-network-recovery
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nibina
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#5
12-08-2011, 05:51 PM

plz..send me the ppt of the topic fast ip network recovery using mrc
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vijayalakshmi.vaka@gmail.com
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20-12-2011, 09:27 PM

plz..send me the ppt of the topic fast ip network recovery using Fast IP Network Recovery using Multiple Routing Configurations
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21-12-2011, 09:30 AM


to get information about the topic"Fast IP Network Recovery using Multiple Routing Configurations"refer the link bellow

topicideashow-to-fast-ip-network-recovery-using-multiple-routing-configurations
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kodavandlaravisankar
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#8
15-02-2012, 11:23 AM

am doing mca am now doing Fast IP Network Recovery using Multiple Routing Configurations plz help me
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#9
29-05-2013, 11:51 AM

Multiple Routing Configurations For Fast IP Network Recovery


.pdf   Multiple Routing.pdf (Size: 519.59 KB / Downloads: 17)

Abstract

Now A Days Internet plays a major role in day to day communication,if a network gets failed the recovery is becoming a major problem. It takes a much time to re-establish the Link To assure fast recovery from link and node failures in IP networks, we present a new recovery scheme called Multiple Routing Configurations (MRC). Our proposed scheme guarantees recovery in all single failure scenarios, using a single mechanism to handle both link and node failures, and without knowing the root cause of the failure. MRC is pure connectionless, and assumes only destination based peer-to-peer forwarding. MRC is based on keeping additional routing information in the routers, and allows packet forwarding to continue on an alternative output link immediately after the detection of a failure. It can be implemented with only minor changes to existing solutions. In this paper we present MRC, and analyze its performance with respect to scalability, backup path lengths,shortest path discovery, and load distribution after a failure. We also show how an estimate of the traffic demands in the network can be used to improve the distribution of the recovered traffic, and thus reduce the chances of congestion when MRC is used.

INTRODUCTION

Inrecent years the Internet has been transformed from a special purpose network to an ubiquitous platform for a wide range of everyday communication services. The demands on Internet reliability and availability have increased accordingly. A disruption of a link in central parts of a network has the potential to affect hundreds of thousands of phone conversations or TCP connections, with obvious adverse effects.

MRC OVERVIEW

MRC is based on building a small set of backup routing configurations, that are used to route recovered traffic on alternate paths after a failure. Our MRC approach is threefold. First, we create a set of backup configurations, so that every network component is excluded from packet forwarding in one configuration. Second, for each configuration, a standard routing algorithm like OSPF is used to calculate configuration specific shortest paths and create forwarding tables in each router, based on the configurations The use of a standard routing algorithm guarantees loop-free forwarding within one configuration.
In our approach, we construct the backup configurations so that for all links and nodes in the network, there is a configuration where that link or node is not used to forward traffic. Thus, for any single link or node failure, there will exist a configuration that will route the traffic to its destination on a path that avoids the failed element. In Section III, we formally describe MRC and how to generate configurations that protect every link and node in a network.

RECOVERY LOAD DISTRIBUTION

MRC recovery is local, and the recovered traffic is
routed in a backup configuration from the point of failure
to the egress node. This shifting of traffic from the
original path to a backup
path affects the load distribution in the network, and
might lead to congestion. If MRC is used for fast
recovery, the load distribution in the network during the
failure depends on three factors:
(a) The link weight assignment used in the normal
Configuration C0,
(b) The structure of the backup configurations, i.e.,
which links and nodes are isolated in each Ci
{C1,……Cn},
© The link weight assignments used in the
backbones B1…….Bn of the backup
configurations.

RELATED WORK

MRC operates without knowing the root cause of failure, i.e., whether the forwarding disruption is caused by a node or link failure. This is achieved by using careful link weight assignment according to the rules we have described. The link weight assignment rules also provide basis for the specification of a forwarding procedure that successfully solves the last hop problem. The performance of the algorithm and the forwarding mechanism has been evaluated using simulations. We have shown that MRC scales well: 3 or 4 backup configurations is typically enough to isolate all links and nodes in our test topologies. MRC backup path lengths are comparable to the optimal backup path lengths—MRC backup paths are typically zero to two hops longer. MRC thus achieves fast recovery with a very limited performance penalty.
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