Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD)
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
seminar projects crazy
Active In SP
**

Posts: 604
Joined: Dec 2008
#1
28-01-2009, 01:33 PM


It is an optical disc technology in the infant state of research, that utilizes the revolutionary collinear holography technique that has one red laser and one blue-green laser collimated into a single beam. The data that is programmed as laser interference fringes from a holographic layer at the top of the disc is read by the blue-green laser where as the servo information from the common CD style aluminum layer near the bottom is read by the red laser, which is used as the reference beam. This disc capable of storing 3.9 terabytes of data also has a dichroic mirror layer between the holographic data and servo data, that can reflect the blue-green laser while allowing the red laser to pass through. This feature has enhanced the performance of this storage media compared to the past holographic storage media where there was lot of interferences due to both the laser passing through also lacked in its compatibility to the current CD and DVD technology. The HVD disc technology has the capacity to store about 6,000 times of a CD-ROM, 830 times of a DVD, 160 times of a single layer blue-ray disc and 8 times of a normal hard drives as of 2006. It also has a transferable rate of 1 Gigabit/s.
Use Search at http://topicideas.net/search.php wisely To Get Information About Project Topic and Seminar ideas with report/source code along pdf and ppt presenaion
Reply
leelu
Active In SP
**

Posts: 3
Joined: Jul 2010
#2
27-07-2010, 06:55 AM


sir can u please provide a full download version of Holographic Versatile Disc

Leelu
Reply
leelu
Active In SP
**

Posts: 3
Joined: Jul 2010
#3
27-07-2010, 07:12 AM

can u please provide me the full download version of Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD)
Reply
leelu
Active In SP
**

Posts: 3
Joined: Jul 2010
#4
27-07-2010, 07:18 AM

I am final year computer science student,I want to submit a seminar and presentation on Halographic storage, I had the content of 10 pages buts its not enough for the submission so i want to add some additional data about Holographic VersatileDisc so kindly provide me a downloadable format link for Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD)....
Reply
projects wizhard
Active In SP
**

Posts: 261
Joined: Jul 2010
#5
29-07-2010, 07:01 PM

Hi,
this thread has enough information for you to make your report:
topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc-a-seminar and presentation-report
Use Search at http://topicideas.net/search.php wisely To Get Information About Project Topic and Seminar ideas with report/source code along pdf and ppt presenaion
Reply
asfiya
Active In SP
**

Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2010
#6
05-08-2010, 05:54 PM

send the full report on Holographic Versatile Disc with images
send immediately
Reply
seminar addict
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 6,592
Joined: Jul 2011
#7
04-02-2012, 11:53 AM

to get information about the topic Holographic versatile disc full report ,ppt and related topic refer the link bellow

topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc-a-seminar and presentation-report

topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc-hvd

topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc-a-seminar and presentation-report?page=3

topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc-a-seminar and presentation-report?page=4

seminar and presentationproject and implimentationsattachment.php?aid=86

topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc-a-seminar and presentation-report?page=2

topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc-a-seminar and presentation-report?page=5

topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc

topicideashow-to-holographic-versatile-disc-hvd--2630
Reply
seminar ideas
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 10,003
Joined: Apr 2012
#8
07-07-2012, 11:00 AM

HOLOGRAPHIC VERSATILE DISC



INTRODUCTION
HOLOGRAPHIC VERSATILE DISC (HVD) is an optical disc technology which would hold up to 3.9 terabytes (TB) of information. The name HVD refers to the holography technology used to read from and record to the disc. Ordinary CDs and DVDs use red laser, while blue laser allows greater density and storage capacity.

In this report we are going to tell you about the basics about the HVD. You will get to know a bit about the short history of HVD, what the blue laser is and the how and whys of the disc itself.

OVERVIEW
Holographic memory has been around for more than 40 years, but several characteristics made it difficult to implement in a consumer market. Holographic versatile disc (HVD) is a holographic storage format that looks like a DVD but is capable of storing far more data. Prototype HVD devices have been created with a capacity of 3.9 terabytes (TB) and a transfer rate of 1 gigabit per second (1 Gbps). At that capacity, an HVD could store as much information as 830 DVDs or 160 Blue-ray discs.


BASIC OF HOLOGRAPHIC MEMORY
3-D image of the Death Star created by holography



The first step in understanding holographic memory is to understand what "holographic" means. Holography is a method of recording patterns of light to produce a three-dimensional object. The recorded patterns of light are called a HOLOGRAM.
The process of creating a hologram begins with a focused beam of light -- a laser beam. This laser beam is split into two separate beams: a reference beam, which remains unchanged throughout much of the process, and an information beam, which passes through an image. When light encounters an image, its composition changes (see How Light Works to learn about this process). In a sense, once the information beam encounters an image, it carries that image in its waveforms. When these two beams intersect, it creates a pattern of light interference. If you record this pattern of light interference -- for example, in a photosensitive polymer layer of a disc -- you are essentially recording the light pattern of the image.
To retrieve the information stored in a hologram, you shine the reference beam directly onto the hologram. When it reflects off the hologram, it holds the light pattern of the image stored there. You then send this reconstruction beam to a CMOS sensor to recreate the original image.
Most of us think of holograms as storing the image of an object, like the Death Star pictured above. The holographic memory systems we're discussing here use holograms to store digital instead of analog information, but it's the same concept. Instead of the information beam encountering a pattern of light that represents the Death Star, it encounters a pattern of light and dark areas that represent ones and zeroes.


HVD TECHNOLOGY

HVD uses a technology called 'collinear holography,' in which two laser rays, one blue-green and one red, are collimated into a single beam. The role of the blue-green laser is to read the data encoded in the form of laser interference fringes from the holographic layer on the top, while the red laser serves the purpose of a reference beam and also to read the servo info from the aluminum layer - like in normal CDs - near the bottom of the disk. The servo info is meant to monitor the coordinates of the read head above the disk (this is similar to the track, head and sector information on a normal hard disk drive).


THE HOLOGRAPHIC VERSATILE DISC


Holographic memory has been around for more than 40 years, but several characteristics made it difficult to implement in a consumer market. First off, most of these systems send the reference beam and the information beam into the recording medium on different axes.

HOLOGRAPHIC VERSATILE DISC


.doc   hvd.doc (Size: 825.24 KB / Downloads: 31)

INTRODUCTION
HOLOGRAPHIC VERSATILE DISC (HVD) is an optical disc technology which would hold up to 3.9 terabytes (TB) of information. The name HVD refers to the holography technology used to read from and record to the disc. Ordinary CDs and DVDs use red laser, while blue laser allows greater density and storage capacity.

In this report we are going to tell you about the basics about the HVD. You will get to know a bit about the short history of HVD, what the blue laser is and the how and whys of the disc itself.

OVERVIEW
Holographic memory has been around for more than 40 years, but several characteristics made it difficult to implement in a consumer market. Holographic versatile disc (HVD) is a holographic storage format that looks like a DVD but is capable of storing far more data. Prototype HVD devices have been created with a capacity of 3.9 terabytes (TB) and a transfer rate of 1 gigabit per second (1 Gbps). At that capacity, an HVD could store as much information as 830 DVDs or 160 Blue-ray discs.


BASIC OF HOLOGRAPHIC MEMORY
3-D image of the Death Star created by holography



The first step in understanding holographic memory is to understand what "holographic" means. Holography is a method of recording patterns of light to produce a three-dimensional object. The recorded patterns of light are called a HOLOGRAM.
The process of creating a hologram begins with a focused beam of light -- a laser beam. This laser beam is split into two separate beams: a reference beam, which remains unchanged throughout much of the process, and an information beam, which passes through an image. When light encounters an image, its composition changes (see How Light Works to learn about this process). In a sense, once the information beam encounters an image, it carries that image in its waveforms. When these two beams intersect, it creates a pattern of light interference. If you record this pattern of light interference -- for example, in a photosensitive polymer layer of a disc -- you are essentially recording the light pattern of the image.
To retrieve the information stored in a hologram, you shine the reference beam directly onto the hologram. When it reflects off the hologram, it holds the light pattern of the image stored there. You then send this reconstruction beam to a CMOS sensor to recreate the original image.
Most of us think of holograms as storing the image of an object, like the Death Star pictured above. The holographic memory systems we're discussing here use holograms to store digital instead of analog information, but it's the same concept. Instead of the information beam encountering a pattern of light that represents the Death Star, it encounters a pattern of light and dark areas that represent ones and zeroes.


HVD TECHNOLOGY

HVD uses a technology called 'collinear holography,' in which two laser rays, one blue-green and one red, are collimated into a single beam. The role of the blue-green laser is to read the data encoded in the form of laser interference fringes from the holographic layer on the top, while the red laser serves the purpose of a reference beam and also to read the servo info from the aluminum layer - like in normal CDs - near the bottom of the disk. The servo info is meant to monitor the coordinates of the read head above the disk (this is similar to the track, head and sector information on a normal hard disk drive).


THE HOLOGRAPHIC VERSATILE DISC


Holographic memory has been around for more than 40 years, but several characteristics made it difficult to implement in a consumer market. First off, most of these systems send the reference beam and the information beam into the recording medium on different axes.
Reply
seminar flower
Super Moderator
******

Posts: 10,120
Joined: Apr 2012
#9
10-08-2012, 03:26 PM

Holographic Versatile Disc


.doc   HVD-report.doc (Size: 1.19 MB / Downloads: 21)

INTRODUCION

An HVD (holographic Versatile Disc), a holographic storage media, is an advanced optical disc that’s presently in the development stage. Polaroid scientist J. van Heerden was the first to come up with the idea for holographic three-dimensional storage media in 1960. An HVD would be a successor to today’s Blu-ray and HD-DVD technologies. It can transfer data at the rate of 1 Gigabit per second. The technology permits over 10 kilobits of data to be written and read in parallel with a single flash. The disc will store upto 3.9 terabyte (TB) of data on a single optical disk.

Holographic data storage, a potential next generation storage technology, offers both high storage density and fast readout rate. In this article, I discuss the physical origin of these attractive technology features and the components and engineering required to realize them. I conclude by describing the current state of holographic storage research and development efforts in the context of ongoing improvement to established storage technologies.

BRIEF HISTORY

Although holography was conceived in the late 1940s, it was not considered a potential storage technology until the development of the laser in the 1960s. The resulting rapid development of holography for displaying 3-D images led researchers to realize that holograms could also store data at a volumetric density of as much as 1/ where is the wave-length of the light beam used.
Since each data page is retrieved by an array of photo detectors, rather than bi-by-bit, the holographic scheme promises fast readout rates as well as high density. If a thousand holograms, each containing a million pixels, could be retrieved every second, for instance, then the output data rate would reach 1 Gigabit per second.
In the early 1990s, interest in volume-holographic data storage was rekindled by the availability of devices that could display and detect 2-D pages, including charge coupled devices (CCD), complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) detector chips and small liquid-crystal panels. The wide availability of these devices was made possible by the commercial success of digital camera and video project and implimentationors. With these components in hand, holographic-storages researchers have begun to demonstrate the potential of their technology in the laboratory. By using the volume of the media, researchers have experimentally demonstrated that data can be stored at equivalent area densities of nearly 400 bits/sq. micron. (For comparison, a single layer of a DVD disk stores data at ~ 4.7 bits/sq. micron) A readout rate of 10 gigabit per second has also been achieved in the laboratory.

UNDERLYING ECHNOLOGY

HOLOGRAPHY

Holographic data storage refers specifically to the use of holography to store and retrieve digital data. To do this, digital data must be imposed onto an optical wave front, stored holographically with high volumetric density, and then extracted from the retrieved optical wav front with excellent data fidelity.

A hologram preserves both the phase and amplitude of an optical wave front of interest called the object beam – by recording the optical interference pattern between it and a second coherent optical beam – the reference beam. Fig 2.1 shows this process.

COLLINEAR HOLOGRAPHY

HVD uses a technology called ‘collinear holography’, in which two laser rays, one blue-green and one red, are collimated into a single beam. The role of the blue-green laser is to read the data encoded in the form of laser interference fringes from the holographic layer on the top, while the red laser serves the purpose of a reference beam and also to read the servo info from the aluminum layer – like in normal CDs – near the bottom of the disk. The servo info is meant to monitor the coordinates of the read head above the disk (this is similar to the track, head and sector information on a normal hard disk drive).

STORAGE DATA

RECORDING DATA

A simplified HVD system consists of the following main components:
Blue or green laser (532-nm wavelength in the test system)
Beam splitter/merger
Mirrors
Spatial light modulator (SLM)
CMOS sensor
Polymer recording medium
The process of writing information onto an HVD begins with encoding the information into binary data to be stored in the SLM. These data are turned into ones and zeroes represented as opaque or translucent areas on a "page" -- this page is the image that the information beam is going to pass through.

When the blue-green argon laser is fired, a beam splitter creates two beams. One beam, called the object or signal beam, will go straight, bounce off one mirror and travel through a spatial-light modulator (SLM). An SLM is a liquid crystal display (LCD) that shows pages of raw binary data as clear and dark boxes.
The information from the page of binary code is carried by the signal beam around to the light-sensitive lithium-niobate crystal. Some systems use a photopolymer in place of the crystal.

READING DATA

To read the data from an HVD, you need to retrieve the light pattern stored in the hologram.
In the HVD read system, the laser project and implimentations a light beam onto the hologram -- a light beam -- a light beam that is identical to the reference beam.
An advantage of a holographic memory system is that an entire page of data can be retrieved quickly and at one time. In order to retrieve and reconstruct the holographic page of data stored in the crystal, the reference beam is shined into the crystal at exactly the same angle at which it entered to store that page of data. Each page of data is stored in a different area of the crystal, based on the angle at which the reference beam strikes it.

HARDWARE

SPATIAL LIGHT MODULATOR

To use volume holography as a storage technology, digital data must be imprinted onto the object beam for recording and then retrieved from the reconstructed object beam during readout. The device for putting data into the system is called a spatial light modulator (SLM) – a planner array consisting of thousand of pixels. Each pixel is independent microscopic shutters that can either block or pass light using liquid-crystal or micro-mirror technology. Liquid crystal panels and micro-mirror arrays with 1280 X 1024 pixels are commercially available due to the success of computer-driven project and implimentationion displays. The pixels in both types of devices can be refreshed over 1000 times per second, allowing the holographic storage system to reach an input data rate of 1 gigabit per second – assuming that laser power and material sensitivities would permit. The data are read using an array of detector pixels, such as a CCD camera or CMOS sensor array.

CONCLUSION

The Information Age has led to an explosion of information available to users. While current storage needs are being me, storage technology must continue to improve in order to keep pace with the rapidly increasing demand. However, conventional data storage technologies, where individual bits are stored as distinct magnetic or optical changes on the surface of a recording medium are approaching physical limits. Storing information throughout the volume of a medium—not just on its surface—offers an intriguing high-capacity alternative. Holographic data storage is a volumetric approach which, although conserved decades ago, has made recent progress towards practicality with the appearance of lower-cost enabling technologies, significant results from longstanding research efforts and progress in holographic recording material.


Reply

Important Note..!

If you are not satisfied with above reply ,..Please

ASK HERE

So that we will collect data for you and will made reply to the request....OR try below "QUICK REPLY" box to add a reply to this page

Quick Reply
Message
Type your reply to this message here.


Image Verification
Please enter the text contained within the image into the text box below it. This process is used to prevent automated spam bots.
Image Verification
(case insensitive)

Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  SEMINAR REPORT ON HOLOGRAPHIC VERSATILE DISK study tips 0 488 22-08-2013, 04:55 PM
Last Post: study tips
  Blu-ray Disc Full Seminar Report project girl 0 483 27-12-2012, 01:01 PM
Last Post: project girl
  A Versatile Test Bench for Wireless RF/Microwave Component Characterization project girl 0 322 11-12-2012, 01:10 PM
Last Post: project girl
  OPTICAL DISC READER PPT project girl 0 386 29-11-2012, 11:15 AM
Last Post: project girl
  Blu-ray Disc full report seminar tips 0 349 09-11-2012, 02:21 PM
Last Post: seminar tips
  BLU RAY DISC seminar or presentation seminar addict 4 2,300 16-10-2012, 11:24 AM
Last Post: seminar flower
  TILTING DISC CHECK VALVE seminar girl 0 376 16-08-2012, 02:18 PM
Last Post: seminar girl
  VERSATILE WATER-LEVEL CONTROLLER seminar flower 0 418 01-08-2012, 03:58 PM
Last Post: seminar flower
  The advantages of Blu-ray disc seminar flower 0 410 24-07-2012, 04:51 PM
Last Post: seminar flower
  FLUORESCENT MULTILAYER DISC full report seminar ideas 0 692 09-07-2012, 03:59 PM
Last Post: seminar ideas