In-Vehicle Networking
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03-04-2010, 05:55 PM


In-vehicle networking, also known as multiplexing, is a method for transferring data among distributed electronic modules via a serial data bus. Without serial networking, inter-module communication requires dedicated, point-to-point wiring resulting in bulky, expensive, complex, and difficult to install wiring harnesses. Applying a serial data bus reduces the number of wires by combining the signals on a single wire through time division multiplexing. Information is sent to individual control modules that control each function, such as anti-lock braking, turn ignals, and dashboard displays


Today's vehicles contain hundreds of circuits, sensors, and many other electrical components. Communication is needed among the many circuits and functions of the vehicle. For example, when the driver presses the headlights switch on the dashboard, the headlights react. For this to occur, communication is needed between the dashboard switch and the front of the vehicle. In current vehicle systems this type of communication is handled via a dedicated wire through point-to-point connections. If all possible combinations of switches, sensors, motors, and other electrical devices in fully featured vehicles are accumulated, the resulting number of connections and dedicated wiring is enormous. Networking provides a more efficient method for today's complex in-vehicle communications.


As the electrical content of today's vehicles continues to increase the need for networking is even more evident. For example, some high-end luxury cars contain more than three miles and nearly 200 pounds of wiring. The resulting number of connectors creates a reliability nightmare.

BENEFITS OF NETWORKING

In-vehicle networking provides many system-level benefits, many of which are only beginning to be realized.
" A decreased number of dedicated wires is required for each function, and thus reduces the size of the wiring harness. System cost, weight, reliability, serviceability, and installation are improved.
" Common sensor data, such as vehicle speed, engine temperature, etc. are available on the network, so data can be shared, thus eliminating the need for redundant sensors.
" Networking allows greater vehicle content flexibility because functions can be added through software changes. Existing systems require an additional module or additional I/O pins for each function added.
" Car manufacturers are discovering new features that are enabled by networking. For example, the 1996 Lincoln Continental's Memory Profile System stores each driver's preference for ride firmness, seat positions, steering assist effort, mirror positions, and even radio station presets.

However, for networking to expand into higher volume economy class vehicles, the overall system benefits need to outweigh the costs. Standardized protocols will enable this expansion. Automotive manufacturers and various automotive industry standards organizations have been working for many years to develop standards for in-vehicle networking. Many standards such as VAN, ABUS, CAN, and SAE J1850 have been developed, but SAE J1850 and CAN 2.0 (Controller Area Network) are the predominant standards.

The early days of networking involved proprietary serial buses using generic UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter) or custom devices. This was acceptable in the US because the Big Three (Ford, GM, Chrysler) were vertically integrated and were not highly dependent on external suppliers.
Use Search at http://topicideas.net/search.php wisely To Get Information About Project Topic and Seminar ideas with report/source code along pdf and ppt presenaion
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10-03-2011, 10:44 AM

In-Vehicle Networking
Today's vehicles contain hundreds of circuits, sensors, and many other electrical components. Communication is needed among the many circuits and functions of the vehicle. For example, when the driver presses the headlights switch on the dashboard, the headlights react. For this to occur, communication is needed between the dashboard switch and the front of the vehicle. In current vehicle systems this type of communication is handled via a dedicated wire through point-to-point connections. If all possible combinations of switches, sensors, motors, and other electrical devices in fully featured vehicles are accumulated, the resulting number of connections and dedicated wiring is enormous. Networking provides a more efficient method for today's complex in-vehicle communications.
In-vehicle networking, also known as multiplexing, is a method for transferring data among distributed electronic modules via a serial data bus. Without serial networking, inter-module communication requires dedicated, point-to-point wiring resulting in bulky, expensive, complex, and difficult to install wiring harnesses. Applying a serial data bus reduces the number of wires by combining the signals on a single wire through time division multiplexing. Information is sent to individual control modules that control each function, such as anti-lock braking, turn ignals, and dashboard displays (see figure 1).
As the electrical content of today's vehicles continues to increase the need for networking is even more evident. For example, some high-end luxury cars contain more than three miles and nearly 200 pounds of wiring. The resulting number of connectors creates a reliability nightmare.
BENEFITS OF NETWORKING
In-vehicle networking provides many system-level benefits, many of which are only beginning to be realized.
" A decreased number of dedicated wires is required for each function, and thus reduces the size of the wiring harness. System cost, weight, reliability, serviceability, and installation are improved.
" Common sensor data, such as vehicle speed, engine temperature, etc. are available on the network, so data can be shared, thus eliminating the need for redundant sensors.
" Networking allows greater vehicle content flexibility because functions can be added through software changes. Existing systems require an additional module or additional I/O pins for each function added.
" Car manufacturers are discovering new features that are enabled by networking. For example, the 1996 Lincoln Continental's Memory Profile System stores each driver's preference for ride firmness, seat positions, steering assist effort, mirror positions, and even radio station presets.
However, for networking to expand into higher volume economy class vehicles, the overall system benefits need to outweigh the costs. Standardized protocols will enable this expansion. Automotive manufacturers and various automotive industry standards organizations have been working for many years to develop standards for in-vehicle networking. Many standards such as VAN, ABUS, CAN, and SAE J1850 have been developed, but SAE J1850 and CAN 2.0 (Controller Area Network) are the predominant standards.
The early days of networking involved proprietary serial buses using generic UART (Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter) or custom devices. This was acceptable in the US because the Big Three (Ford, GM, Chrysler) were vertically integrated and were not highly dependent on external suppliers.
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18-03-2011, 03:45 PM

Seminar Report on In Vehicle Networking
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16-03-2012, 10:32 AM

to get information about the topic "vehicle networking" full report ppt and related topic refer the link bellow

topicideashow-to-in-vehicle-networking

topicideashow-to-in-vehicle-networking--19921
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01-11-2012, 04:11 PM

In-Vehicle Networking

.pdf   In-Vehicle.pdf (Size: 637.48 KB / Downloads: 17)


History

Automotive networking has always relied
on standardized serial communications
hardware, but it was rarely compatible.
In the late 1990s, the LIN Consortium
was founded by five European
automakers, Volcano Automotive Group
and Freescale (at the time Motorola)
to solve this problem. The first fully
implemented version of the new LIN
specification was published in November
2002 as LIN version 1.3. In September
2003, version 2.0 was introduced to
expand configuration capabilities and
make provisions for significant additional
diagnostics features and tool interfaces.
Some North American automakers were
concerned about the rising complexity
and lack of direct North American
representation in the LIN Consortium.
As a result of their concerns, a Society
of American Engineers (SAE) task force,
which was part of the committee that
standardizes vehicle networking, was
formed to help ensure LIN 2.0 was
suitable for global implementation.
Although a full consensus was never
reached, the task force published the
SAE J2602 Recommended Practice for
LIN Networks document, which seeks
to fully specify ambiguities and optional
features of the LIN 2.0 specification.

Slave LIN Interface Controller (SLIC)
Enables Higher Integration


Freescale offers an exceptional embedded
SLIC module that automates LIN message
handling to help increase performance while
reducing development time and cost. It allows
you to devote more CPU to the application
and gives you the ability to use ROM devices
or state machines.
SLIC helps increase performance in
several ways. True auto-synchronization
and auto-bauding find LIN frames and
automatically adjust the baud rate without
CPU intervention. SLIC reduces interrupt
processing up to 83 percent over UART
solutions with only two interrupts for any
message. This makes it possible to use
SYNCH data from messages to trim the
oscillator. SLIC also eliminates many steps
normally required by UART solutions (trim
oscillator, detect break, measure sync
signal, adjust baud rate, calculate and
verify checksum, handle individual data
bytes, detect errors and more).
SLIC helps reduce development time by
eliminating message processing steps,
simplifying and minimizing driver code to
as small as 120 bytes (refer to Freescale’s
Application Note AN2633). Minimized driver
code translates into shortened debug and
development time, which enables you to
use your engineering time to debug the
application rather than LIN communication.

RKE Systems

RKE systems make it possible to unlock
doors and release trunk latches remotely
using a key fob or other similar device. Many
include some security functionality, such
as anti-theft alarms, remote start and panic
buttons. Freescale was an early pioneer
in RKE system development and is now
the first to offer an integrated low-voltage
microcontroller with embedded RF for RKE
applications developers.
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