ROTARY DISTRIBUTOR DIESEL FUEL INJECTION PUMP
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
project report helper
Active In SP
**

Posts: 2,270
Joined: Sep 2010
#1
28-10-2010, 02:50 PM



.pdf   10001.pdf (Size: 827.1 KB / Downloads: 254)
ROTARY DISTRIBUTOR DIESEL FUEL INJECTION PUMP

Stanadyne, Inc.
Diesel Systems Division
Windsor, Connecticut
National Historic Engineering Landmark





HISTORY


The year was 1947. The place was Hartford, Connecticut. Diesel power was about to make an historic move forward. At that time, the world of high-speed diesel power in the U.S. was very limited. Less than 5 percent of all engines being built, even for nonautomotive applications, were diesels. Diesel power had proven to have real advantages. But for many applications, the price was prohibitive. A small or medium-size high-speed diesel engine simply cost too much compared to its gasoline counterpart. The high cost problem centered around the diesel fuel injection systems available at the time. A simpler, less expensive form of fuel injection was needed before diesels could compete effectively in the small or medium-size high-speed engine field. The answer came from a man who had learned about diesel engines the hard way – by installing and Rotary Distribution Principle maintaining diesel-electric generator sets in New York City. His name was Vernon Roosa. And he brought his answer to Stanadyne’s Hartford Division. Roosa threw aside the traditional in-line injection pump with its pumping element for each engine cylinder. Instead, he used a single pumping unit to feed all the cylinders. Thus, the new pump had the same number of parts regardless of the number of cylinders.
Reply
seminar paper
Active In SP
**

Posts: 6,455
Joined: Feb 2012
#2
16-03-2012, 01:04 PM

ROTARY DISTRIBUTOR DIESEL FUEL INJECTION PUMP



.pdf   10001.pdf (Size: 827.1 KB / Downloads: 43)

HISTORY
The year was 1947. The place was Hartford,
Connecticut. Diesel power was about to make an
historic move forward.
At that time, the world of high-speed diesel
power in the U.S. was very limited. Less than 5
percent of all engines being built, even for nonautomotive
applications, were diesels.
Diesel power had proven to have real
advantages. But for many applications, the price
was prohibitive. A small or
medium-size high-speed
diesel engine simply cost too
much compared to its
gasoline counterpart.
The high cost problem
centered around the diesel
fuel injection systems
available at the time. A
simpler, less expensive form
of fuel injection was needed
before diesels could compete
effectively in the small or
medium-size high-speed
engine field.
The answer came from a
man who had learned about
diesel engines the hard way
– by installing and
Rotary Distribution Principle
maintaining diesel-electric
generator sets in New York
City. His name was Vernon Roosa. And he brought
his answer to Stanadyne’s Hartford Division.
Roosa threw aside the traditional in-line
injection pump with its pumping element for
each engine cylinder. Instead, he used a single
pumping unit to feed all the cylinders. Thus, the
new pump had the same number of parts
regardless of the number
of cylinders.



TECHNICAL BACKGROUND
General Description – An external view of a
typical pump is shown in Fig. 1 and an internal
section in Fig. 2.
The main rotating components are the drive
shaft (1), distributor rotor (2), transfer pump
blades (5), and governor components (11).
The drive shaft engages the distributor rotor
in the hydraulic head. The drive end of the
rotor incorporates two pumping plungers.
The plungers are actuated toward each
other simultaneously by an internal cam ring
through rollers and shoes which are carried in
slots at the drive end of the rotor. The number
of cam lobes normally equals the number of
engine cylinders.

The transfer pump at the rear of the rotor is
the postive displacement vane-type and is
enclosed in the end cap. The end cap also
houses the fuel inlet strainer and transfer pump
pressure regulator. Transfer pump pressure is
automatically compensated for viscosity effects
due to both temperature changes and various
fuel grades.
The distributor rotor incorporates two
charging ports and a single axial bore with one
discharge port to serve all head outlets to the
injection tubings. The hydraulic head contains
the bore in which the rotor revolves, the metering
valve bore, the charging ports and the head
outlet fittings. The high pressure injection
tubings leading to the nozzles are fastened to
these fittings.
Distributor pumps contain their own
mechanical governor capable of close speed
regulation. Both all-speed and min-max types
are available. The centrifugal force of the weights
in their retainer is transmitted through a sleeve
to the governor arm and through a linkage to
the metering valve. The metering valve can be
closed to shut off fuel through the linkage by an
independently operated shut-off lever.


He subsequently
went to work for a Long
Island firm making diesel
electric generator sets
for New York apartments.
His inventions have ranged far beyond
diesel engine pumps. He holds 350 patents,
both United States and foreign, which fill three
thick volumes. Among them are a stapler, a
butane lighter for outdoor fireplaces, a novel
toilet flush system, a nail polish remover bottle
with a brush, a gas tank filler and numerous
electrical switching devices.
The inventor has a
keen interest in higher
education. He donated a
chair in applied science
to Trinity College, where
he once taught as an
adjunct professor, and in
1984, pledged funds for
a chair in manufacturing
engineering at the
University of Hartford’s
College of Engineering.
In addition, to help train
disabled workers, he
invented a “hands free”
head lantern for the
Hartford Easter Seal
Rehabilitation Center.
The Center makes and
sells the product to the
government, forest fire
Vernon D. Roosa
In the fall of 1939, to fill fighters, and on the
commercial market. He also developed and
donated the equipment for manufacturing the
head lamp.
the need for a variable speed and output generator,
he concentrated on making a fuel injection pump
that would meet the stringent requirements of
this application and a year later had one in
operation. About this time, the armed services
were seeking a new method for close speed
regulation of generator sets. Roosa produced a
second design, simpler and extremely small in
size compared to other makes, with a selfcontained
plunger completely sealed against dirt,
water and oil leakage.
Reply

Important Note..!

If you are not satisfied with above reply ,..Please

ASK HERE

So that we will collect data for you and will made reply to the request....OR try below "QUICK REPLY" box to add a reply to this page

Quick Reply
Message
Type your reply to this message here.


Image Verification
Please enter the text contained within the image into the text box below it. This process is used to prevent automated spam bots.
Image Verification
(case insensitive)

Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  pistonless pump pdf jaseelati 0 280 23-02-2015, 03:08 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  pedal powered water pump ppt jaseelati 0 249 07-02-2015, 03:09 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  do drum brakes automatically pump the brakes jaseelati 0 230 02-02-2015, 02:58 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  large scale power generation using fuel cell abstract jaseelati 0 195 18-12-2014, 02:44 PM
Last Post: jaseelati
  Pistonless Pump for Rockets full report and ppt project topics 8 10,514 15-11-2014, 04:08 PM
Last Post: mkaasees
  A Seminar Report On GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP seminar projects maker 0 774 30-09-2013, 02:52 PM
Last Post: seminar projects maker
  pistonless pump for rocket seminar presentation 7 8,358 29-09-2013, 08:13 PM
Last Post: Guest
  How do Fuel Cells Compare to Internal Combustion Engines and Batteries? seminar projects maker 0 514 14-09-2013, 04:18 PM
Last Post: seminar projects maker
  SEMINAR REPORT On Fuel Energizer seminar projects maker 0 620 12-09-2013, 01:07 PM
Last Post: seminar projects maker
  Performance of Single Cylinder DI Diesel Engine seminar ideas 2 4,254 25-07-2013, 12:17 PM
Last Post: livon