Tongue Drive System
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ANJU.K.S
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12-07-2010, 08:16 PM


My name in Anju.K.S. I need a full seminar and presentation report and presentation slides about the topic "TONGUE DRIVE SYSTEM" for my seminar and presentation.I have only a abstract about this topic and the abstract is pasted below:

Tongue Drive system

A new assistive technology developed by engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology could help individuals with severe disabilities lead more independent lives.

The novel system allows individuals with disabilities to operate a computer control a powered wheelchair and interact with their environments simply by moving their tongues.

This device could revolutionize the field of assistive technologies by helping individuals with severe disabilities, such as those with high-level spinal cord injuries, return to rich, active, independent and productive lives," said Maysam Ghovanloo, an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Hope this technology will reduce the need of individuals with severe disabilities to receive continuous assistance from family members or caregivers, thus significantly reducing healthcare and assistance costs. This system may also make it easier for them to work and communicate with others, such as friends and family."

To operate the Tongue Drive system, potential users only need to be able to move their tongues. Attaching a small magnet, the size of a grain of rice, to an individual's tongue by implantation, piercing or tissue adhesive allows tongue motion to direct the movement of a cursor across a computer screen or a powered wheelchair around a room.

We chose the tongue to operate the system because unlike hands and feet, which are controlled by the brain through the spinal cord, the tongue is directly connected to the brain by a cranial nerve that generally escapes damage in severe spinal cord injuries or neuromuscular diseases. Tongue movements are also fast, accurate and do not require much thinking, concentration or effort.

Movement of the magnetic tracer attached to the tongue is detected by an array of magnetic field sensors mounted on a headset outside the mouth or on an orthodontic brace inside the mouth. The sensor output signals are wirelessly transmitted to a portable computer, which can be carried on the user's clothing or wheelchair.

The sensor output signals are processed to determine the relative motion of the magnet with respect to the array of sensors in real-time. This information is then used to control the movements of a cursor on the computer screen or to substitute for the joystick function in a powered wheelchair.

The system can potentially capture a large number of tongue movements, each of which can represent a different user command. A unique set of specific tongue movements can be tailored for each individual based on the user's abilities, oral anatomy, personal preferences and lifestyle.

An individual could potentially train our system to recognize touching each tooth as a different command. The ability to train our system with as many commands as an individual can comfortably remember is a significant advantage over the common sip-n-puff device that acts as a simple switch controlled by sucking or blowing through a straw.

The Tongue Drive system is also non-invasive and does not require brain surgery like some of the brain-computer interface technologies.

Ghovanloo's group recently completed trials in which six able-bodied individuals tested the Tongue Drive system. Each participant defined six tongue commands that would substitute for computer mouse tasks “ left, right, up and down pointer movements and single- and double-click.

During the testing session, the user moved his or her tongue to one of the predefined command positions and the mouse pointer started moving in the selected direction. To move the cursor faster, users could hold their tongue in the position of the issued command to gradually accelerate the pointer until it reached a maximum velocity.

Results of the computer access test by novice users with the current Tongue Drive prototype showed a response time of less than one second with almost 100 percent accuracy for the six individual commands. This is equivalent to an information transfer rate of approximately 150 bits per minute, which is much faster than the bandwidth of most brain-computer interfaces.

The researchers have also tested the ability of twelve able-bodied individuals to operate an electric-powered wheelchair with the Tongue Drive system. The next step is to test and assess the usability and acceptability of the system by people with severe disabilities.

The research team has also begun to develop software to connect the Tongue Drive system to a wide variety of readily available communication tools such as text generators, speech synthesizers and readers. In addition, the researchers plan to add control commands, such as switching the system into standby mode to permit the user to eat, sleep or engage in a conversation while extending battery life.

The tongue-operated assistive technology, called the Tongue Drive system, was described on June 29 at the 2008 Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation.
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#2
12-07-2010, 09:01 PM

The recent technological advancements in sensor development, wireless communication, and computing have dramatically promoted research of new assistance technologies. The case of the quadriplegic is of particular interest in the development of the Tongue Drive System (TDS), which is a wireless non-obtrusive tongue operated assistive technology for people with severe disabilities. Quadriplegia is the clinical condition under which all voluntary muscles in the legs, the arms and torso of the body lose their ability to function. This is typically caused by severe trauma in the area of the fifth to seventh cervical vertebrae. This type of trauma damages the spinal cord significantly enough to sever all control of the voluntary muscles below the neck. The vital organs are able to function autonomously of the spinal cord. This allows them to remain functionally intact. Most quadriplegic patients maintain functional control over their tongue through cranial nerves and are able to speak and move their tongue without difficulty. The TDS seeks to allow patients with quadriplegia to have more control over their environment through their tongue motions. The system extracts patientsâ„¢ intentions by detecting patientsâ„¢ tongue movements and converts them into control commands to operate devices in the patientsâ„¢ environment. In TDS, a small permanent magnet is secured on the patient's tongue as a tracer. The magnetic field variation, which is a result of tongue movements, can be detected by a pair of magneto-inductive sensor modules mounted inside or outside the mouth and translated into various commands. These commands can then be used to wirelessly communicate with the devices in userâ„¢s environment, such as a powered wheelchair, TV or telephone. and the Movement of the magnetic tracer attached to the tongue is detected by an array of magnetic field sensors mounted on a headset outside the mouth or on an orthodontic brace inside the mouth. The sensor output signals are wirelessly transmitted to a portable computer, which can be carried on the user's clothing or wheelchair.
The sensor output signals are processed to determine the relative motion of the magnet with respect to the array of sensors in real-time. This information is then used to control the movements of a cursor on the computer screen or to substitute for the joystick function in a powered wheelchair.
The system can potentially capture a large number of tongue movements, each of which can represent a different user command. A unique set of specific tongue movements can be tailored for each individual based on the user's abilities, oral anatomy, personal preferences and lifestyle.

[img]sciencedailyimages/2008/06/080630090821.jpg[/img]


read more
rehab.research.va.gov/jour/08/45/6/pdf/huo.pdf
ece.gatech.edu/enrichment/ors/participants/2008-2009/abstracts/Abstract_Jones_Qureshi.pdf
gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/movies/tongue-drive.mov
ieeexplore.ieeeiel5/11145/35661/01693892.pdf?arnumber=1693892



hope these all links help you lot..
Use Search at http://topicideas.net/search.php wisely To Get Information About Project Topic and Seminar ideas with report/source code along pdf and ppt presenaion
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nashnanassar
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#3
26-07-2010, 12:20 AM

I need a full contents,ppt& report of tongue drive system
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nashnanassar
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#4
26-07-2010, 12:59 AM

I need full content & ppt of tongue drive system
I need a full content & ppt of tongue drive system
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jijoandjojy
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#5
26-07-2010, 01:19 PM

Quote:Tongue Drive System Lets Persons With Disabilities Operate Powered Wheelchairs, Computers


The novel system allows individuals with disabilities to operate a computer, control a powered wheelchair and interact with their environments simply by moving their tongues.
"This device could revolutionize the field of assistive technologies by helping individuals with severe disabilities, such as those with high-level spinal cord injuries, return to rich, active, independent and productive lives," said Maysam Ghovanloo, an assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Ghovanloo developed the system with graduate student Xueliang Huo.
The tongue-operated assistive technology, called the Tongue Drive system, was described on June 29 at the 2008 Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Annual Conference in Washington, D.C. An article about this system is also scheduled to appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation.
To operate the Tongue Drive system, potential users only need to be able to move their tongues. Attaching a small magnet, the size of a grain of rice, to an individual's tongue by implantation, piercing or tissue adhesive allows tongue motion to direct the movement of a cursor across a computer screen or a powered wheelchair around a room.
"We chose the tongue to operate the system because unlike hands and feet, which are controlled by the brain through the spinal cord, the tongue is directly connected to the brain by a cranial nerve that generally escapes damage in severe spinal cord injuries or neuromuscular diseases," said Ghovanloo, who started working on this project and implimentation about three years ago at North Carolina State University. "Tongue movements are also fast, accurate and do not require much thinking, concentration or effort."
Movement of the magnetic tracer attached to the tongue is detected by an array of magnetic field sensors mounted on a headset outside the mouth or on an orthodontic brace inside the mouth. The sensor output signals are wirelessly transmitted to a portable computer, which can be carried on the user's clothing or wheelchair.
The sensor output signals are processed to determine the relative motion of the magnet with respect to the array of sensors in real-time. This information is then used to control the movements of a cursor on the computer screen or to substitute for the joystick function in a powered wheelchair.
The system can potentially capture a large number of tongue movements, each of which can represent a different user command. A unique set of specific tongue movements can be tailored for each individual based on the user's abilities, oral anatomy, personal preferences and lifestyle.
"An individual could potentially train our system to recognize touching each tooth as a different command," explained Ghovanloo. "The ability to train our system with as many commands as an individual can comfortably remember is a significant advantage over the common sip-n-puff device that acts as a simple switch controlled by sucking or blowing through a straw."
The Tongue Drive system is also non-invasive and does not require brain surgery like some of the brain-computer interface technologies.
Ghovanloo's group recently completed trials in which six able-bodied individuals tested the Tongue Drive system. Each participant defined six tongue commands that would substitute for computer mouse tasks -- left, right, up and down pointer movements and single- and double-click. For each trial, the individual began by training the system. During the five-minute training session, the individual repeated each of the six designated tongue movements 10 times.
During the testing session, the user moved his or her tongue to one of the predefined command positions and the mouse pointer started moving in the selected direction. To move the cursor faster, users could hold their tongue in the position of the issued command to gradually accelerate the pointer until it reached a maximum velocity.
Results of the computer access test by novice users with the current Tongue Drive prototype showed a response time of less than one second with almost 100 percent accuracy for the six individual commands. This is equivalent to an information transfer rate of approximately 150 bits per minute, which is much faster than the bandwidth of most brain-computer interfaces, according to Ghovanloo.
The researchers have also tested the ability of twelve able-bodied individuals to operate an electric-powered wheelchair with the Tongue Drive system. The next step is to test and assess the usability and acceptability of the system by people with severe disabilities, said Ghovanloo. He is teaming with the Shepherd Center, an Atlanta-based catastrophic care hospital, and the Georgia Tech Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access, to conduct those trials.
The research team has also begun to develop software to connect the Tongue Drive system to a wide variety of readily available communication tools such as text generators, speech synthesizers and readers. In addition, the researchers plan to add control commands, such as switching the system into standby mode to permit the user to eat, sleep or engage in a conversation while extending battery life.


Attached Files
.pdf   13966293-Tongue-Drive-System-Doc-Com-Pleated.pdf (Size: 513.98 KB / Downloads: 534)
.pptx   34833342-TONGUE-DRIVE-SYSTEM-Power-Point.pptx (Size: 872.88 KB / Downloads: 355)
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tweety4u
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#6
16-08-2010, 06:19 PM

hiee everyone...!! i want ppt on transperent electronics plz.......
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Deshaun09
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#7
30-11-2010, 01:39 PM

Your seminar and presentation report content is really good ..i need it..
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seminar surveyer
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#8
01-12-2010, 09:41 AM

thanks Deshaun09. if you need the report, please download it
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swapnil6728
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#9
21-01-2011, 09:19 PM

plz send me ieee authorised abstract and research papers........
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#10
22-01-2011, 09:59 AM

following links will help you.

sciencedailyreleases/2008/06/080630090821.htm
eniac.forumotiont255-tongue-drive-system-to-operate-computers
esciencenewsarticles/2008/06/30/tongue.drive.system.lets.persons.with.disabilities.operate.powered.wheelchairs.computers


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#11
22-03-2011, 10:44 AM

PRESENTED BY:
PRAKASH.V

ABSTRACT:
A new assistive technology developed by engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. It help individuals with severe disabilities lead more independent lives. The individuals with disabilities
such as to operate a computer control a powered wheelchair and Interact with their environments simply by moving their tongues.
The tongue-operated assistive technology, called the Tongue Drive system, was described on June 29 at the 2008 Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.=
INTRODUCTION
This device could revolutionize the field of assistive technologies by helping individuals with severe disabilities, such as those with high-level spinal cord injuries, return to rich, active, independent and productive lives
An article about this system is also scheduled to appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation.
WHY TO CHOOSE A TONGUE ???
TDS chose the tongue to operate the system because unlike hands and feet, which are controlled by the brain through the spinal cord, the tongue is directly connected to the brain by a cranial nerve that generally escapes damage in severe spinal cord injuries or neuromuscular diseases.
TDS PROCESSING
Tongue movements are also fast, accurate and do not require much thinking, concentration or effort. Movement of the magnetic tracer attached to the tongue is detected by an array of magnetic field sensors mounted on a headset outside the mouth or on an orthodontic brace inside the mouth. The sensor output signals are wirelessly transmitted to a portable computer, which can be carried on the user's clothing or wheelchair.
The sensor output signals are processed to determine the relative motion of the magnet with respect to the array of sensors in real-time
This information is then used to control the movements of a cursor on the computer screen or to substitute for the joystick function in a powered wheelchair.
PROTOTYPE TONGUE DRIVE SYSTEM
The system can potentially capture a large number of tongue movements, each of which can represent a different user command. A unique set of specific tongue movements can be tailored for each individual based on the user's abilities, oral anatomy, personal preferences and lifestyle.
An individual could potentially train our system to recognize touching each tooth as a different command. The ability to train our system with as many commands as an individual can comfortably remember is a significant advantage over the common sip-n-puff device that acts as a simple switch controlled by sucking or blowing through a straw.
The Tongue Drive system is also non-invasive and does not require brain surgery like some of the brain-computer interface technologies.
TASKS PERFORMED IN TDS
Computer mouse tasks – left, right, up and down pointer movements and single- and double-click. For each trial, the individual began by training the system. During the five-minute training session, the individual repeated each of the six designated tongue movements 10 times.
During the testing session, the user moved his or her tongue to one of the predefined command positions and the mouse pointer started moving in the selected direction. To move the cursor faster, users could hold their tongue in the position of the issued command to gradually accelerate the pointer until it reached a maximum velocity.
Results of the computer access test by novice users with the current Tongue Drive prototype showed a response time of less than one second with almost 100 percent accuracy for the six individual commands. This is equivalent to an information transfer rate of approximately 150 bits per minute, which is much faster than the bandwidth of most brain-computer interfaces
The research team has also begun to develop software to connect the Tongue Drive system to a wide variety of readily available communication tools such as text generators, speech synthesizers and readers. In addition, the researchers plan to add control commands, such as switching the system into standby mode to permit the user to eat, sleep or engage in a conversation while extending battery life.
MODES IN POWERED WHEEL CHAIR
Operated the powered wheelchair using two different control strategies:
DISCRETE MODE
CONTINUOUS MODE

Discrete mode, designed for novice users, and continuous mode for more experienced users.
In discrete mode, if the user issued the command to move forward and then wanted to turn right, the user would have to stop the wheelchair before issuing the command to turn right. The default stop command was when the tongue returned to its resting position, bringing the wheelchair to a standstill.
Discrete mode is a safety feature particularly for novice users, but it reduces the agility of the wheel chair movement.
In continuous mode, however, the user is allowed to steer the powered wheelchair to the left or right as it is moving forward and backward, thus making it possible to follow a curve.”
ADVANTAGES OF TDS
Ø Allows disabled people to power a wheelchair
Ø Allows disabled people to use a computer
Ø Allows disabled people to not depend on others
Ø Allows disabled people to have more freedom
Ø Allows disabled people to become employable
DRAWBACKS
Ø Computer battery could die when not around charger
Ø Could take a while to learn how to use it
Ø Might not be affordable for some people
Ø Decreases job opportunities for some
Ø Computer could go down
CONCLUSION
Tongue drive system technology is a gift for the physically challenged and disabled persons to lead their life equal to the normal persons in the society.


Attached Files
.doc   TONGUE DRIVE SYSTEM.doc (Size: 270.5 KB / Downloads: 118)
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monika1724@gmail.com
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#12
25-03-2011, 06:53 PM

hii my name is monika.I need a full contents,ppt& report of tongue drive system.
plz send me on monika1724@gmail.com
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06-04-2011, 04:01 PM


.pptx   ppt of tongue driven system-Mukesh Singh.pptx (Size: 1.68 MB / Downloads: 134)
“THE TONGUE DRIVE SYSTEM”
ASSISTIVE DEVICE
DEFINITION:

 The "Tongue Drive System” is a tongue-operated assistive devise which helps individuals with physical disabilities such as spinal cord injuries.
 This system is controlled by the movement of tongue.
 The controlled devices may be wheelchair or computer system. Fig….
DEVELOPMENT:
 This system was developed by the engineers of “Georgia Institute Of Technology , United States’’ in June 2008.
 It is one of the nation's top research universities, distinguished by its commitment to improving the human condition .
WHY THE TONGUE?
 Tongue movement is fast, accurate and does not require much concentration or effort.
 Unlike hands and feet, which are controlled by the brain through the spinal cord, the tongue is directly connected to the brain by a cranial nerve.
 It generally escapes in severe spinal cord injuries or other damages and it’s movement continues.
AN EXAMPLE:
COMPONENTS:

 Permanent Magnetic Tracer -
 A small permanent magnet is placed on the tongue by piercing, or tissue adhesives that is used as a tracer.
 The movement of which is detected by an array of magnetic field sensors mounted on a headset outside the mouth.
 Magnetic Sensor Module :
To receive the signals from from magnetic tracer a hall effect magnetic sensor is used. It is placed on headset around the mouth. It is used to measure the magnetic field generated by the magnetic tracer.
 Control Unit : It is used to transmit the wireless signals.
Wireless Receiver :
Wireless signals are received by a wireless receiver which is called Personal Digital Assistance (PDA). The Sensor Signal processing algorithm runs on PDA.
• Driven System :
The driven system may be computer, wheelchair or motorized bed.
COMPONENT DIAGRAM:
HOW DOSE IT WORK?

 To operate the TDS the motion of the tongue is traced by an array of magnetic sensors, which measure the magnetic field.
 The magnetic field generated by the tracer varies as the tongue moves. This variation is detected by the sensor.
 The sensor outputs is then digitized, modulated and transmitted across a wireless link to an external controller, called Personal Digital Assistance (PDA).
 A Sensor Signal Processing algorithm running on the PDA classifies the sensor signals and converts them into user control command.
 A set of specific tongue movements can be tailored for each individuals.
 Now the signals received by external controller are demodulated and demultiplexed to extract the individual sensor output.
 By processing these outputs we can controlled the movement of the pointer on the screen.
 Assigning a certain controller function to each tongue movement is done by the software.
 There are six commands: right, left, up , down pointer movements, single and double clicks.
 If the user quickly flicks the magnet towards one of the front sensors, it is considered a tongue click.
 we had one sensor along the x-axis, one along the. y-axis, and two along the z-axis with respect to the imaginary coordinates of the face shield.
 To minimize the effects of external magnetic field interference, including the earth magnetic field, we used a three-axis module as a reference electronic compass.
 It is placed on top of the face shield.
SSP ALGORITHM :
 The SSP algorithm running on the PC was developed in Lab VIEW and MATLAB environments.
 Lab VIEW is a graphical programming environment to develop sophisticated measurement test and control system using graphical icons and wires.
 MATLAB is a high level technical computing language and interactive environment for algorithm development.
SSP ALGORITHM :
 It works in two phases: Training and Testing.
 Training phase uses principal component analysis to extract the important features of the sensor out waveforms for each specific commands.
 The user repeats each of the six designated
commands 10 times in 3-second intervals, while a total of 12 samples (3 per sensor) are recorded in 12-variable vectors for each repetition.
SSP ALGORITHM :
• The PCA based feature-extraction algorithm calculates the eigenvectors and Eigen values of the matrix in a three-dimensional (3-D) space based on the 12-variable vectors.
• Three eigenvectors with the largest Eigen values are then chosen to set up the feature matrix [v1, v2,v3].
• By multiplying the training vectors with the feature matrix, the SSP algorithm forms a cluster (class) of 10 data points from training for each specific command in the PCA virtual 3-D feature space.
• Once a cluster is formed for each command, the testing phase can be executed.
 During this phase a three-sample window is slid over the incoming sensor signals to reflect them onto the 3-D feature space as new data points by using the feature matrix.
 We develop the GUI in lab VIEW environment.
 GUI FOR TDS PROTOTYPE:
PERFORMANCE :
• Command time : shows how quickly a command is given to the computer by the user.
• The TDS response time : includes thinking about the command, its associated tongue movement and any delays associated with wireless transmission, and SSP computations.
• Obviously, the shorter the response time, the better.
 We consider the percentage of correctly completed commands (CCC %) as an additional parameter along with the response time.
 A GUI was developed for this experiment to randomly select one out of six direct commands and turn on its indicator.
 The subject was asked to issue the indicated command within a specified time period T.
 Information transfer rate :
ADVANTAGES :
 The signals from the magnetic sensors are linear functions the magnetic field, which is a continuous position dependent property. Thus a few sensors are able to capture a wide variety of tongue movements.
 This would provide a tremendous advantage over switch based devices.
 These would offer smoother, faster, and more natural controls as the user is saved the trouble of multiple on/off switch operations.
 In Tongue Drive system on the other hand, the additional switches are unnecessary since a specific tongue movement can be assigned to the button press.
 The permanent magnet which generates the magnetic field is a small, passive, and inherently wireless component which leads to user convenience.
 Due to the proximity of the magnet and Hall-effect sensors in the oral cavity, the Tongue Drive system is expected to be more robust against noise, interference, and involuntary movements compared to alternative technologies.
DISADVANTAGES :
 Implementation is slightly harder.
 Slightly costlier.
CONCLUSION:
 Tongue drive system is a touch free , wireless & non-invasive technology that needs no surgery for its operation.
 The result of the trial showed 100% of the command were accurate with the response time less than one second which equal to an information transfer rate of approximately 150 bits/min.
 The next step of research is to develop software to connect the tongue drive system to a great number of devices such as text generators, speech synthesizers and readers.
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12-04-2011, 04:02 PM

you can find the details on tongue drive system in this page


topicideashow-to-tongue-drive-system?pid=43535#pid43535
and topicideashow-to-tongue-drive-system
Use Search at http://topicideas.net/search.php wisely To Get Information About Project Topic and Seminar ideas with report/source code along pdf and ppt presenaion
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#15
21-01-2012, 03:18 PM

Tongue drive Technology


.ppt   Tongue drive technology.ppt (Size: 3.6 MB / Downloads: 49)

WHAT IS TDT?


A new assistive technology developed by engineers at the Georgia Institute of Technology could help individuals with severe disabilities lead more independent lives.

WHY ONLY TONGUE?


The tongue is directly connected to the brain by a cranial nerve that generally escapes damage in severe spinal cord injuries or neuromuscular diseases.
"Tongue movements are also fast, accurate and do not require much thinking, concentration or effort.“


ADVANTAGES


Captures a wide variety of tongue movements.

Advantage over switch based devices

Smoother, faster, and more natural controls.

Power saving and miniaturized package

Robust against noise, interference, and involuntary movements.

Native Language

DISADVANTAGES

Implementation is slightly harder

CONCLUSION

We shall hope that this technology will reduce the need of individuals with severe disabilities to receive continuous assistance from family members or caregivers, thus significantly reducing healthcare and assistance costs,“

"This system may also make it easier for them to work and communicate with others, such as friends and family.




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