wi-max seminar or presentation report
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tanaya padhee
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#1
04-02-2010, 10:27 PM


sir plz send me the full report on wi-max.
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project report tiger
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#2
04-02-2010, 11:25 PM

for getting full report on wi-max please view the pages
topicideashow-to-WiMAX--5303
topicideashow-to-WIMAX-IEEE
topicideashow-to-WiMAX

read carefully ,....
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projectsofme
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#3
28-09-2010, 03:19 PM


.doc   wimax.doc (Size: 205.5 KB / Downloads: 601)
This article is presented by:
1.A.PRIYANKA
2.Y.PADMAJA


ABSTRACT

WiMax (Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access) is a wireless broadband Technology, which supports point to multi-point (PMP) broadband wireless access.

Broadband today—or some call it, broadband Internet—is as important as waterways, railroads and interstate highways of an earlier era
Until now broadband connections either had to be offered by companies that own physical lines to buildings, which meant the telcos and cable operators, or they had to come from expensive satellite links or from wireless broadband systems that didn’t have economies of scale in their componentry. To solve the above problem the technology called WiMAX based on IEEE 802.16 standard is on the way and is expected to provide affordable broadband for all and improve the quality of life. WiMAX is a long –distance fixed wireless solution which is expected to outpace the growth of broadband wireline options as cellular phones have supplanted many land line users.
This paper will provide a very strong introduction about
1. WiMAX technology
2. Architecture of wimax.
3. Standards and scope of wimax technology
4. Its challenges and advantages for end user connectivity and its scope
5. Deployment status of this technology,


Introduction:
WiMAX is defined as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access by the WiMAX Forum, formed in June 2001 to promote conformance and interoperability of the IEEE 802.16 standard, officially known as Wireless MAN. The Forum describes WiMAX as "a standards-based technology enabling the delivery of last mile wireless broadband access as an alternative to cable and DSL".
WiMAX is not a technology, but rather a certification mark, or 'stamp of approval' given to equipment that meets certain conformity and interoperability tests for the IEEE 802.16 family of standards. A similar confusion surrounds the term Wi-Fi, which like WiMAX, is a certification mark for equipment based on a different set of IEEE standards from the 802.11 working group for wireless local area networks (WLAN). Neither WiMAX, nor Wi-Fi is a technology but their names have been adopted in popular usage to denote the technologies behind them. This is likely due to the difficulty of using terms like 'IEEE 802.16' in common speech and writing.
Potential applications of wimax due its efficient bandwidth are:
• Providing high-speed mobile data and telecommunications services (4G).
• Providing a diverse source of Internet connectivity as part of a business continuity plan. That is, if a business has a fixed and a wireless internet connection they are unlikely to be affected by the same service outage.

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project report helper
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#4
09-10-2010, 04:36 PM



.docx   WiMAX.docx (Size: 150.04 KB / Downloads: 294)
wi-max seminar and presentation report

Presented by:
P. Ranjith
Jayamukhi Institute of Technological Sciences
Narsampet
Warangal-506002

WiMAX Technology
For a wire-free world

Abstract:

The main problems with broadband access today are that it is pretty expensive and it doesn't reach all areas. The main problem with WiFi access is that hot spots are very small, so coverage is sparse. What if there were a new technology that solved all of these problems? This new technology would provide:
The high speed of broadband service.
Wireless rather than wired access, so it would be a lot less expensive than cable or DSL and much easier to extend to suburban and rural areas.
Broad coverage like the cell phone network instead of small WiFi hotspots.
This system is actually coming into being right now, and it is called WiMAX.
WiMAX or Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access has emerged as the most promising wide-area wireless broadband technology in a short span of time. The technology is being adopted in a number of markets and is poised for dramatic growth in India as well. As it can cover relatively long distances, WiMAX has the potential to serve everything from low-density residential applications to enterprise customers. Many companies are closely examining WiMAX for "last mile" connectivity at high data rates. This could result in lower pricing for both home and business customers as competition lowers prices.
In areas without pre-existing physical cable or telephone networks, WiMAX will, it appears, be a viable alternative for broadband access that has been economically unavailable. Prior to WiMax, many operators have been using proprietary fixed wireless technologies for broadband services.
In this paper we will discuss about the WiMAX technology other technologies competing with it and the growth of this technology in India.

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project report helper
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#5
28-10-2010, 01:25 PM


.doc   wimax.doc (Size: 388 KB / Downloads: 283)

Wireless DSL (WDSL)

ABSTRACT



In recent years, Broadband technology has rapidly become an established, global commodity required by a high percentage of the population. The demand has risen rapidly, with a worldwide installed base of 57 million lines in 2002 rising to an estimated 80 million lines by the end of 2003. This healthy growth curve is expected to continue steadily over the next few years and reach the 200 million mark by 2006. DSL operators, who initially focused their deployments in densely-populated urban and metropolitan areas, are now challenged to provide broadband services in suburban and rural areas where new markets are quickly taking root. Governments are prioritizing broadband as a key political objective for all citizens to overcome the “broadband gap” also known as “digital divide”.

Wireless DSL (WDSL) offers an effective, complementary solution to wireline DSL, allowing DSL operators to provide broadband service to additional areas and populations that would otherwise find themselves outside the broadband loop. Government regulatory bodies are realizing the inherent worth in wireless technologies as a means for solving digital-divide challenges in the last mile and have accordingly initiated a deregulation process in recent years for both licensed and unlicensed bands to support this application. Recent technological advancements and the formation of a global standard and interoperability forum - WiMAX, set the stage for WDSL to take a significant role in the broadband market. Revenues from services delivered via Broadband Wireless Access have already reached $323 million and are expected to jump to $1.75 billion.
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#6
29-12-2010, 04:39 PM




.docx   Wi.docx (Size: 34.11 KB / Downloads: 80)

Broadband wireless sits at the confluence of two of the most remarkable growth stories of the telecommunications industry in recent years. Both wireless and broadband have on their own enjoyed rapid mass-market adoption. The staggering growth of the Internet is driving demand for higher-speed Internet-access services, leading to a parallel growth in broadband adoption .
So what is broadband wireless? Broadband wireless is about bringing the broadband experience to a wireless context, which offers users certain unique benefits and convenience. There are two fundamentally different types of broadband wireless services. The first type attempts to provide a set of services similar to that of the traditional fixed-line broadband but using wireless as the medium of transmission. This type, called fixed wireless broadband, can be thought of as a competitive alternative to DSL or cable modem. The second type of broadband wireless, called mobile broadband, offers the additional functionality of portability, nomadicity and mobility. Mobile broadband attempts to bring broadband applications to new user experience scenarios and hence can offer the end user a very different value proposition. Wi-MAX is an acronym that stands for World-wide Interoperability for Microwave Access and this technology is designed to accommodate both fixed and mobile broadband applications.

EVOLUTION OF BROADBAND WIRELESS
WiMAX technology has evolved through four stages, albeit not fully distinct or clearly sequential: (1) narrowband wireless local-loop systems, (2) first-generation line-of-sight (LOS) broadband systems, (3) second-generation non-line-of-sight (NLOS) broadband systems, and (4) standards-based broadband wireless systems.

NARROWBAND WIRELESS LOCAL-LOOP SYSTEMS

Naturally, the first application for which a wireless alternative was developed and deployed was voice telephony. These systems, called wireless local-loop (WLL), were quite successful in developing countries such as China, India, Indonesia, Brazil, and Russia. In fact, WLL systems based on the digital-enhanced cordless telephony (DECT) and code division multiple access (CDMA) standards continue to be deployed in these markets.
During the same time, several small start-up companies focused solely on providing Internet-access services using wireless. These wireless Internet service provider (WISP) companies typically deployed systems in the license-exempt 900MHz and 2.4GHz bands. Most of these systems required antennas to be installed at the customer premises, either on rooftops or under the eaves of their buildings. Deployments were limited mostly to select neighborhoods and small towns. These early systems typically offered speeds up to a few hundred kilobits per second. Later evolutions of license-exempt systems were able to provide higher speeds.

FIRST-GENERATION BROADBAND SYSTEMS

As DSL and cable modems began to be deployed, wireless systems had to evolve to support much higher speeds to be competitive. Systems began to be developed for higher frequencies, such as the 2.5GHz and 3.5GHz bands. Very high speed systems, called local multipoint distribution systems (LMDS), supporting up to several hundreds of megabits per second, were also developed in millimeter wave frequency bands, such as the 24GHz and 39GHz bands. LMDS-based services were targeted at business users.
In the late 1990s, one of the more important deployments of wireless broadband happened in the so-called multi channel multipoint distribution services (MMDS) band at 2.5GHz. The MMDS band was historically used to provide wireless cable broadcast video services, especially in rural areas where cable TV services were not available. The advent of satellite TV ruined the wireless cable business, and operators were looking for alternative ways to use this spectrum. A few operators began to offer one-way wireless Internet-access service, using telephone line as the return path.
The first generations of these fixed broadband wireless solutions were deployed using the same towers that served wireless cable subscribers. These towers were typically several hundred feet tall and enabled LOS coverage to distances up to 35 miles, using high-power transmitters. First-generation MMDS systems required that subscribers install at their premises outdoor antennas high enough and pointed toward the tower for a clear LOS transmission path. The outdoor antenna and LOS requirements proved to be significant impediments. Besides, since a fairly large area was being served by a single tower, the capacity of these systems was fairly limited. Similar first-generation LOS systems were deployed internationally in the 3.5GHz band.

SECOND-GENERATION BROADBAND SYSTEMS
Second-generation broadband wireless systems were able to overcome the LOS issue and to provide more capacity. This was done through the use of a cellular architecture and implementation of advanced-signal processing techniques to improve the link and system performance under multi path conditions. Several start-up companies developed advanced proprietary solutions that provided significant performance gains over first-generation systems. Most of these new systems could perform well under non-line-of-sight conditions, with customer-premise antennas typically mounted under the eaves or lower. Many solved the NLOS problem by using such techniques as orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM), code division multiple access (CDMA), and multi antenna processing. A few megabits per second throughput over cell ranges of a few miles had become possible with second-generation fixed wireless broadband systems.

EMERGENCE OF STANDARDS-BASED TECHNOLOGY

In 1998, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) formed a group called 802.16 to develop a standard for what was called a wireless metropolitan area network, or wireless MAN. Originally, this group focused on developing solutions in the 10GHz to 66GHz band, with the primary application being delivering high-speed connections to businesses that could not obtain fiber. These systems, like LMDS, were conceived as being able to tap into fiber rings and to distribute that bandwidth through a point-to-multipoint configuration to LOS businesses. The IEEE 802.16 group produced a standard that was approved in December 2001. This standard, Wireless MAN-SC, specified a physical layer that used single-carrier modulation techniques and a media access control (MAC) layer with a burst time division multiplexing (TDM) structure that supported both frequency division duplexing (FDD) and time division duplexing (TDD).
After completing this standard, the group started work on extending and modifying it to work in both licensed and license-exempt frequencies in the 2GHz to 11GHz range, which would enable NLOS deployments. This amendment, IEEE 802.16a, was completed in 2003, with OFDM schemes added as part of the physical layer for supporting deployment in multipath environments. By this time, OFDM had established itself as a method of choice for dealing with multipath for broadband and was already part of the revised IEEE 802.11 standards. Besides the OFDM physical layers, 802.16a also specified additional MAC-layer options, including support for orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA).
Further revisions to 802.16a were made and completed in 2004. This revised standard, IEEE 802.16-2004, replaces 802.16, 802.16a, and 802.16c with a single standard, which has also been adopted as the basis for HIPERMAN (high-performance metropolitan area network) by ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute). In 2003, the 802.16 group began work on enhancements to the specifications to allow vehicular mobility applications. That revision, 802.16e, was completed in December 2005 and was published formally as IEEE 802.16e-2005. It specifies scalable OFDM for the physical layer and makes further modifications to the MAC layer to accommodate high-speed mobility.

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mamta hooda
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01-03-2011, 07:56 PM

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02-03-2011, 12:04 PM


.docx   wimax-complete.docx (Size: 230.68 KB / Downloads: 88)
INTRODUCTION
WiMAX, meaning Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access, is a telecommunications technology that provides wireless transmission of data using a variety of transmission modes, from point-to-multipoint links to portable and fully mobile internet access. The technology provides up to 10 Mbps broadband speed without the need for cables. The technology is based on the IEEE 802.16 standard (also called Broadband Wireless Access). The name "WiMAX" was created by the WiMAX Forum, which was formed in June 2001 to promote conformity and interoperability of the standard. The forum describes WiMAX as "a standards-based technology enabling the delivery of last mile wireless broadband access as an alternative to cable and DSL.
The 802.16 standards are sometimes referred to colloquially as "WiMAX", "mobile WiMAX", "802.16d" and "802.16e.” Their formal names are as follow:
 802.16-2004 is also known as 802.16d, which refers to the working party that has developed that standard. It is sometimes referred to as "fixed WiMAX," since it has no support for mobility.
 802.16e-2005, often abbreviated to 802.16e, is an amendment to 802.16-2004. It introduced support for mobility, among other things and is therefore also known as "mobile WiMAX".
WiMAX refers to interoperable implementations of the IEEE 802.16 wireless-networks standard, in similarity with Wi-Fi, which refers to interoperable implementations of the IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN standard.
MAC (data link) layer
In Wi-Fi the media access controller (MAC) uses contention access — all subscriber stations that wish to pass data through a wireless access point (AP) are competing for the AP's attention on a random interrupt basis. This can cause subscriber stations distant from the AP to be repeatedly interrupted by closer stations, greatly reducing their throughput.
In contrast, the 802.16 MAC uses a scheduling algorithm for which the subscriber station needs to compete only once (for initial entry into the network). After that it is allocated an access slot by the base station. The time slot can enlarge and contract, but remains assigned to the subscriber station, which means that other subscribers cannot use it. In addition to being stable under overload and over-subscription, the 802.16 scheduling algorithm can also be more bandwidth efficient. The scheduling algorithm also allows the base station to control QoS parameters by balancing the time-slot assignments among the application needs of the subscriber stations.
Physical layer
The original version of the standard on which WiMAX is based (IEEE 802.16) specified a physical layer operating in the 10 to 66 GHz range. 802.16a, updated in 2004 to 802.16-2004, added specifications for the 2 to 11 GHz range. 802.16-2004 was updated by 802.16e-2005 in 2005 and uses scalable orthogonal frequency-division multiple access (SOFDMA) as opposed to the orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) version with 256 sub-carriers (of which 200 are used) in 802.16d. More advanced versions, including 802.16e, also bring multiple antenna support through MIMO. See: WiMAX MIMO. This brings potential benefits in terms of coverage, self installation, power consumption, frequency re-use and bandwidth efficiency. 802.16e also adds a capability for full mobility support. The WiMAX certification allows vendors with 802.16d products to sell their equipment as WiMAX certified, thus ensuring a level of interoperability with other certified products, as long as they fit the same profile.
Most commercial interest is in the 802.16d and 802.16e standards, since the lower frequencies used in these variants suffer less from inherent signal attenuation and therefore give improved range and in-building penetration. Already today, a number of networks throughout the world are in commercial operation using certified WiMAX equipment compliant with the 802.16d standard.
B. Deployment
As a standard intended to satisfy needs of next-generation data networks (4G), 802.16e is distinguished by its dynamic burst algorithm modulation adaptive to the physical environment the RF signal travels through. Modulation is chosen to be spectroscopically more efficient (more bits per OFDM/SOFDMA symbol). That is, when the bursts have a high signal strength and acarrier to noise plus interference ratio (CINR), they can be more easily decoded using digital signal processing (DSP). In contrast, operating in less favorable environments for RF communication, the system automatically steps down to a more robust mode (burst profile) which means fewer bits per OFDM/SOFDMA symbol; with the advantage that power per bit is higher and therefore simpler accurate signal processing can be performed.
Burst profiles are used inverse (algorithmically dynamic) to low signal attenuation; meaning throughput between clients and the base station is determined largely by distance. Maximum distance is achieved by the use of the most robust burst setting; that is, the profile with the largest MAC frame allocation trade-off requiring more symbols (a larger portion of the MAC
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#9
16-02-2012, 04:29 PM

to get information about the topic Wi-max full report ppt and related topic refer the link bellow

topicideashow-to-wi-max-seminar and presentation-report

topicideashow-to-wimax-seminar and presentation

topicideashow-to-wi-max-seminar and presentation-report?page=3


topicideashow-to-wi-max-seminar and presentation-report?page=2

topicideashow-to-wimax-ieee

topicideashow-to-wimax--5303?page=2

topicideashow-to-wimax--15864
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23-02-2012, 10:58 AM

to get information about the topic wimax technology full report ppt and related topic refer the link bellow

the following thread contains more details on wimax technology . please go through it.

topicideashow-to-wi-max-seminar and presentation-report

topicideashow-to-wimax-technology-simple-explanation?pid=62030#pid62030
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